355 cardiac catheterizations, 19 open heart operations conducted on Hajj pilgrims: Saudi Health Ministry

The ministry’s Save a Life program provides pilgrims with free specialized medical services, including open heart surgery, cardiac catheterization, kidney dialysis, gastrointestinal endoscopy and birth delivery. (SPA)
Updated 30 August 2017
0

355 cardiac catheterizations, 19 open heart operations conducted on Hajj pilgrims: Saudi Health Ministry

JEDDAH: The Health Ministry said its hospitals in Makkah and Madinah have so far conducted 355 cardiac catheterizations and 19 open heart operations on pilgrims during this Hajj season.
They also carried out 1,277 dialysis procedures, 72 binocular operations and 454 general surgeries.
The number of patients visiting emergency sections in Makkah and Madinah hospitals reached 18,436, while the numbers visiting out-patient clinics and centers reached 27,738 and 188,402, respectively, the ministry said.
Almost 2,000 pilgrims were admitted to hospital. There were 32 cases of thermal stress and one of sunstroke.
The ministry’s Save a Life program provides pilgrims with free specialized medical services, including open heart surgery, cardiac catheterization, kidney dialysis, gastrointestinal endoscopy and birth delivery.
The ministry has also activated field and emergency medical services during the Hajj season, preparing 100 small ambulances to work as mobile intensive care units, and 80 well-equipped large ambulances. It has also prepared some 29,000 medical practitioners.

Tips and advice for diabetics during Hajj
Health professionals recommend that diabetics who plan to perform Hajj to monitor their blood glucose to maintain control of normal levels and take their medication as prescribed.
They stressed the importance of diet, exercises and medication, either tablets or insulin, to maintain normal blood sugar levels, which will allow diabetic pilgrims to perform Hajj without causing any harm to their health.
“Every diabetic patient who performs Hajj should carry an identification card or wear a medic-alert bracelet, providing the name of his illness, the name of his treatment, and his dose.”
The identification card should be electronic to carry sufficient information, which shows the patient’s history, medications and condition.
The diabetic patient should bring an adequate supply of their medication for their travels and stay during Hajj so as not to disturb the performance of the rituals.
Patients who use insulin should also purchase a refrigerated case for preserving insulin to avoid degradation.


Saudi university launches survey into the effects of women driving

Trainee Maria Al-Faraj practices changing a tire during a driving lesson at the Saudi Aramco Driving Center in Dhahran. Reuters/File
Updated 14 min 11 sec ago
0

Saudi university launches survey into the effects of women driving

  • A scientific survey about cars and drivers is being distributed on social media outlets, targeting male and female citizens and residents
  • The data will be analyzed to help make recommendations to benefit the community and the interests of the country

JEDDAH: Researchers will observe and document the effects women driving in Saudi Arabia have on the economy, environment, community and traffic safety. It will also gather information about attitudes toward the change in the law, and the experience of women who get behind the wheel.
With the ban on women driving in the Kingdom due to be lifted on June 24, 2018, Imam Abdulrahman bin Faisal University in Dammam has launched a national study titled “The impact of women’s driving on sustainable development and traffic safety in the Kingdom.”
Researchers from the university, headed by Dr. Najah bint Moqbel Al-Qarawi, a professor of geography of transportation, will supervise the project in collaboration with a specialist team from the General Directorate of Traffic.
Al-Qarawi said that a scientific survey about cars and drivers is being distributed on social media outlets, targeting male and female citizens and residents from all parts of society, in cities and villages. The questionnaire will reveal how participants feel about the issue of women driving and the potential effects it will have.
It will also measure the extent of support for the move from men, while women will be asked about their means of transportation and the main problems they face. Women who want to drive will also be asked about driving, training, the process for getting a license, their fears and aspirations, and for suggestions that might make the process easier and more appealing.
The survey will be carried out in two stages, before and after women get behind the wheel.
The data will be analyzed to help make recommendations to benefit the community and the interests of the country.
Everyone who completes a survey will be entered in a draw to win one of several cars from Almajdouie car company.