MERS claims 2; 3 new cases recorded this week after lull, Saudi Health Ministry says

A Saudi man with protective mask speaks on his mobile phone in Jeddah. (Reuters file photo)
Updated 06 September 2017
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MERS claims 2; 3 new cases recorded this week after lull, Saudi Health Ministry says

RIYADH: The Ministry of Health this week recorded two deaths and three new cases of the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS) after a brief lull.
A 36-year-old Saudi man died of the virus in Buraidah, while the new case, a 21-year-old Saudi female, was diagnosed with MERS in Dawmat Al-Jandal; her condition is stable.
A 69-year-old expatriate man died of MERS in Jeddah on Thursday, said the ministry, adding that two other people had recovered, a Saudi woman, aged 30, in Dammam and a Saudi man, aged 46, in Hail.
The ministry on Wednesday reported two new MERS cases, female citizens aged 18 and 22, in Dawmat Al-Jandal. Their conditions are reported to be stable.
Nine MERS cases were reported in Dawmat Al-Jandal in mid-August, and a total of seven patients are currently undergoing treatment in various hospitals in the Kingdom.
Since MERS first emerged in the Kingdom in June 2012, 693 have died, and the total number of recovered is 1,007.
The Ministry of Health has issued repeated warnings on how to avoid the infection and launched various campaigns to foster public awareness about the disease.
Those who work on farms are advised to take maximum precautions against the virus by wearing face masks, isolating infected animals and following the basic principles of hygiene.


Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, said Saudi Arabia's foreign minister. (AFP)
Updated 16 November 2018
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Al-Jubeir: Saudi-led coalition ‘working with UN to end Yemen conflict’

  • Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, says Saudi FM
  • Al-Jubeir: Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict

RIYADH: The Saudi-led coalition is working with UN envoy Martin Griffith to reach a political solution to the conflict in Yemen based on UN Security Council resolution 2216, the Gulf Initiative and the outcomes of Yemeni national dialogue, the Saudi foreign minister said on Thursday. 

“Since day one, we said that the solution… is a political solution, and the solution should lead to the restoration of legitimacy in Yemen,” said Adel Al-Jubeir.

“We support a peaceful solution in Yemen. We support the efforts of the UN envoy for the Yemeni cause,” he added.

“We are committed to providing all humanitarian support to our brothers there. We are also working on the post-war reconstruction of Yemen.” The Kingdom supports the envoy’s efforts to hold negotiations at the end of November, added Al-Jubeir.

Saudi Arabia is the largest provider of humanitarian aid to Yemen, providing more than $13 billion since the start of the conflict, he said.

In contrast, Houthi militias are imposing restrictions on Yemeni cities and villages, leading to starvation, he added. 

They are also seizing humanitarian aid and preventing Yemenis from getting cholera vaccinations, Al-Jubeir said. 

The Houthis fire ballistic missiles indiscriminately at Saudi Arabia, use children as fighters and plant mines across Yemen, he added. 

The Houthis should engage in the political process and respond to the will of the international community to end the war and end the coup against the legitimate government, he said.

Saudi Arabia did not want the conflict in Yemen; it was imposed on the Kingdom, Al-Jubeir added. 

Saudi Arabia worked with other Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) member states to develop the Gulf Initiative. 

This led to a transition from former President Ali Abdullah Saleh to the internationally recognized government headed by current President Abed Rabbo Mansour Hadi.

The Kingdom also worked to develop Yemeni national dialogue that led to a Yemeni vision regarding the country’s future.

A new Yemeni constitution was about to be drafted when the Houthis seized much of the country, including the capital. 

Yemen’s legitimate government requested support, and the Saudi-led coalition responded under Article 51 of the UN Charter.