Calling all art fans: Louvre Abu Dhabi opening date announced

The museum is part of the Saadiyat Cultural District. (Photo courtesy: saadiyatculturaldistrict.ae)
Updated 06 September 2017
0

Calling all art fans: Louvre Abu Dhabi opening date announced

DUBAI: The opening date of the much-awaited Louvre Abu Dhabi has been announced as November 11 of this year.
Crown Prince of Abu Dhabi Sheikh Mohammed bin Zayed Al-Nahyan made the announcement on Twitter, after an official press conference, to the delight of art fans in the country.
The museum is located on Manarat Saadiyat island in Abu Dhabi and is part of the Saadiyat Cultural District, which will also be home to the Zayed National Museum and Guggenheim Abu Dhabi.
At the opening announcement ceremony, the country’s Minister of Culture and Knowledge Development Sheikh Nahyan bin Mubarak Al-Nahyan said “Beauty is the essence of Louvre Abu Dhabi.”
He added: “People from every corner of the world will visit Louvre Abu Dhabi… It represents the latest innovation in a long-standing tradition of cultural awareness and appreciation nurtured by the leaders of the UAE.”
Director of the Louvre Abu Dhabi Manuel Rabate said all the art works are in place, awaiting visitors.
“There are some 600 pieces of art from French museums. This is the biggest place of art work. I am proud to have so many pieces of art being made available to public,” he said, according to Khaleej Times.
 


Archaeologists find ancient rock art in Egypt

Updated 13 June 2018
0

Archaeologists find ancient rock art in Egypt

  • The Antiquities Ministry said Wednesday the discovery in the Wadi Umm Tineidba, by an Egyptian-American mission from Yale University, includes at least three concentrations of rock art.
  • Egypt hopes such discoveries will encourage tourism as it struggles to revive its economy after years of unrest.

CAIRO: Egypt says archaeologists have unearthed 3,500-year-old rock art depicting bulls, donkeys and sheep in the Eastern Desert.
The Antiquities Ministry said Wednesday the discovery in the Wadi Umm Tineidba, by an Egyptian-American mission from Yale University, includes at least three concentrations of rock art.
Mission chief John Coleman Darnielen says the discovery provides evidence for the continuity and interaction of artistic styles of the Eastern Desert and Nile Valley.
Egypt hopes such discoveries will encourage tourism as it struggles to revive its economy after years of unrest.