Dubai signs deal to target Chinese property buyers

DLD said that since 1996, some 4,475 Chinese buyers have completed 8,259 real estate deals in Dubai. (Reuters)
Updated 13 September 2017
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Dubai signs deal to target Chinese property buyers

DUBAI: Dubai Land Department (DLD) has signed an agreement with UC Forward, the Chinese parent company behind the Fang.com property portal, to promote the emirate’s property market to Chinese investors.
DLD said that the parties have set a joint objective of securing Dh1 billion worth of investment from Chinese buyers.
Under the deal, UC Forward will promote the Land Department’s work through Chinese channels and foster cooperation between Chinese and Dubai real estate companies. It will also offer consultancy services regarding investments, transactions and rental disputes and provide Dubai Real Estate Institute-certified courses in Chinese for training brokers.
UC Forward will also establish its own counter at DLD’s offices in Al-Fahidi Hall, where it will provide free consultancy services both in Chinese and in English to Chinese investors.
DLD said that since 1996, some 4,475 Chinese buyers have completed 8,259 real estate deals in Dubai. Figures published by last month state that Chinese buyers completed 2,177 of these deals between January 2016 and July this year, spending Dh3.14 billion in the process.
DLD’s director-general, Sultan Butti bin Mejren, said in a press statement on Tuesday: “UC Forward will play an important advisory role, including raising awareness of the advantages of investing in Dubai’s real estate market, and helping to protect investors and their rights by clearly communicating our laws and regulations in both Chinese and English.”


In Trump rebuke, US Senate votes to reimpose ban on China’s ZTE

Updated 19 June 2018
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In Trump rebuke, US Senate votes to reimpose ban on China’s ZTE

  • ZTE has been on life support ever since Washington said it had banned US companies from selling crucial hardware and software components to the company for seven years.
  • ZTE's fiberoptic networks depend on US components and its cheap smartphones sold en masse abroad are powered by US chips and the Android operating system.

WASHINGTON: The US Senate defied President Donald Trump by voting Monday to overrule his administration’s deal with Chinese telecom firm ZTE and reimpose a ban on high-tech chip sales to the company.
Senators added an amendment targeting ZTE into a sweeping, must-pass national defense spending bill that cleared the chamber on an 85-10 vote.
The company has been on life support ever since Washington said it had banned US companies from selling crucial hardware and software components to ZTE for seven years, after staffers violated trade sanctions against Iran and North Korea.
It was fined $1.2 billion for those violations, but earlier this month the Trump administration gave ZTE a lifeline by easing sanctions in exchange for a further $1.4 billion penalty on the company.
The Senate measure nullifies that action, proposing an outright ban on the government buying products and services from ZTE and another Chinese telecoms firm, Huawei.
“We’re heartened that both parties made it clear that protecting American jobs and national security must come first when making deals with countries like China, which has a history of having little regard for either,” a bipartisan group of senators said.
The lawmakers, who introduced the amendment, include top Democrat Chuck Schumer and Republican Marco Rubio.
Providing $716 billion in funding for national defense for fiscal year 2019 and giving policy guidance to the Pentagon, the bill is not a done deal.
The House of Representatives passed its own version of the measure, and the two chambers must now hash out a compromise.
“It is vital that our colleagues in the House keep this bipartisan provision in the bill as it heads toward a conference,” Schumer and Rubio said.
ZTE, which employs 80,000 people, said recently that its major operations had “ceased” after the ban, raising the possibility of its collapse.
Its fiberoptic networks depend on US components and its cheap smartphones sold en masse abroad are powered by US chips and the Android operating system.