Egypt acknowledges secret arrest of rights lawyer

In this Feb. 12, 2016 file photo, the family of Giulio Regeni follows his coffin during the funeral service in Fiumicello, Northern Italy. Regeni was killed under suspicious circumstances during a police crackdown in Cairo. The issue has come to the fore once again after Egyptian prosecutors ordered the detention for 15 days of lawyer Ibrahim Metwally, who assisted the family of Regeni, accusing him of disseminating false news. (AP Photo/Paolo Giovannini, File)
Updated 13 September 2017
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Egypt acknowledges secret arrest of rights lawyer

CAIRO: Egypt on Wednesday acknowledged the detention of a human rights lawyer who went missing on his way to a UN conference on forced disappearances, accusing him of disseminating fake news.
Ibrahim Metwally, who was arrested at Cairo International Airport three days ago and initially held incommunicado, may have been targeted because he provided legal aid to the family of Giulio Regeni, an Italian graduate student who was abducted and tortured to death in 2016 during a police crackdown in Cairo.
Regeni’s killing sparked a major diplomatic row with Italy, which said Egyptian authorities had not fully cooperated with investigators and withdrew its ambassador in protest last year. On Wednesday a new ambassador arrived, signaling an improvement in relations.
Egyptian authorities have denied any involvement in Regeni’s killing, but activists say it bore the hallmarks of police brutality. Regeni went missing in Cairo on Jan. 25, 2016, when police were out in force to prevent protests, and his body was found days later, bearing the signs of intense torture.
The Supreme State Security Prosecution on Wednesday acknowledged Metwally had been detained, and ordered him held for 15 days in Cairo’s sprawling Tora Prison complex pending investigations. It said he was interrogated Tuesday night.
Egypt has severely limited the work of the country’s human rights community amid a wider crackdown on dissent since the military overthrew an elected Islamist president in 2013. Authorities have imposed travel bans and frozen the assets of several prominent human rights advocates in recent years, and parliament has passed legislation banning most foreign funding for rights organizations. In recent months Egypt has also blocked hundreds of websites, including many run by rights groups.
The Egyptian Commission for Rights and Freedoms said authorities should immediately release Metwally, drop all criminal charges against him, and report on steps taken to investigate and ensure accountability in the case.
“He was charged with managing a group created against the law, spreading false news, and cooperation with foreign organizations,” it said in a statement, adding that family members and lawyers only discovered Metwally’s whereabouts Tuesday evening, while his home was raided.
Metwally co-founded Egypt’s Association of the Families of the Disappeared after his own son vanished in July 2013 during clashes at an Islamist protest.
An expert on the matter who has been lobbying Egyptian authorities on the issue since 2014, Metwally had been invited to speak to the UN Working Group on Enforced Disappearances.
Egyptian authorities have taken similar measures against other rights advocates who have tried to travel abroad to take part in international forums, in what critics say is an effort to conceal its poor human rights record.
Egypt acknowledged Metwally’s detention hours before the new Italian ambassador, Giampaolo Cantini, arrived in Cairo. The new envoy has been tasked with pursuing the Regeni case, which outraged many in Italy and sparked a popular campaign to pressure officials to uncover the truth.
There was no media access to Cantini’s welcoming ceremony at the VIP lounge of Cairo’s international airport.
Pier Antonio Panzeri, chair of the European Parliament’s Subcommittee on Human Rights, said it was “unacceptable that a prominent lawyer should vanish at an airport,” and urged Egyptian authorities to ensure Metwally’s “immediate and unconditional release.”
“The continued practice of detaining the families of people subjected to enforced disappearance reflects the persistent trend of harassment and intimidation of human rights defenders, lawyers and ordinary citizens by the Egyptian authorities through the misuse of the criminal justice system,” he said in a statement late Tuesday.
Rights groups say enforced disappearances and torture are endemic in Egypt. At least two other individuals have disappeared this year after following up on cases of friends or relatives secretly detained by authorities.
Ahmed Abdullah, another lawyer who assisted the Regeni family, was tried on similar charges to those leveled against Metwally and at one point faced the death penalty during his 4 ½ months in prison before he was released.
“It’s very dangerous working on this case, and now with the return of an Italian ambassador the regime is becoming emboldened to sweep it away,” he said. “But Giulio was one of us, he was killed like an Egyptian and he deserves the truth be told, so we will not give up in obtaining justice.”
Just after the new Italian ambassador arrived, the Egyptian Interior Ministry, which is in charge of police, announced it had signed a joint protocol with its Italian counterparts to train African police to combat organized crime and illegal immigration.
“It reflects the confidence of the Italian and European security services in the expertise of the Egyptian security services,” the ministry said in a statement.


Syrian regime’s killing spree continues in largest opposition holdout

A member of Hayat Tahrir Al-Sham group watches as a convoy of busses gets ready to enter the towns of Fuaa and Kefraya to evacuate their residents on Wednesday. (AFP)
Updated 19 July 2018
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Syrian regime’s killing spree continues in largest opposition holdout

  • Israel has occupied the Golan Heights since 1967, and a cease-fire deal was reached in 1974
  • The regime offensive has displaced more than 230,000 people, many of them on the run in the open

BEIRUT: Syrian regime forces determined to retake the largest opposition holdout in the country’s southwest unleashed an intense bombing campaign, killing at least a dozen people and wounding over 100 in a densely populated town, activists and rescuers said on Wednesday.
The aerial bombardment of the town of Nawa came after talks to cede the town failed on Tuesday, triggering the heavy bombardment.
Separately, some 7,000 civilians were expected to be evacuated from two pro-regime villages in northwestern Syria as part of a negotiated deal with insurgents who have besieged them for three years.
The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said “frenzied” overnight bombing in Nawa and the town’s surroundings continued into Wednesday, with at least 350 missiles launched. The Observatory said at least 12 people were killed as rescuers struggled to get to the casualties.
Khaled Solh, head of the local Syria Civil Defense known as White Helmets, said they have documented 14 people killed while Nawa’s only hospital was bombed and rendered non-operational on late Tuesday. Only one ambulance was able to get to the town and civilians relied on their cars to bring out at least 150 wounded. He said one of the last orthopedists in the town was killed in the strikes.
The regime has stepped up its military offensive on the remaining opposition pockets in the southwestern region, which includes the Daraa and Quneitra provinces that straddle the border with Jordan and the frontier with the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights. In recent days, Syrian forces have turned to the last opposition pockets near the frontier with Israel.
Images from across the frontier in the Israel-occupied Golan Heights showed large plumes of smoke rising over the Nawa area, as the bombing continued on Wednesday.
Hundreds of civilians were seen taking cover in shelters along the frontier, apparently seeking safety in the de-militarized zone between the two countries. Israel has occupied the Golan Heights since 1967, and a cease-fire deal was reached in 1974.
In less than a month, regime forces backed by Russian air power have been able to seize control of most of southwestern Daraa province, including the provincial capital of the same name. The city of Daraa was the cradle of the uprising against Bashar Assad more than seven years ago.
Alongside the military offensive, the government has struck “reconciliation” deals, essentially a negotiated capitulation in a number of villages that have been in rebel hands for years, to restore government control there.
Talks to hand over Nawa, one of the most densely populated towns in Daraa province, have been ongoing for a couple of days. That has encouraged displaced civilians to return to Nawa, said a local activist who goes by the name Selma Mohammed.
But the talks faltered, triggering the overnight onslaught and a new wave of displacement, with hundreds leaving the town again.
On Wednesday, the bombing focused on towns and villages surrounding Nawa, making the road in and out of town deadly, Mohammed said.
The Observatory said warplanes and ground forces have also targeted the southern tip of the region, which is held by militants affiliated with Daesh.
The regime offensive has displaced more than 230,000 people, many of them on the run in the open. Jordan said it will not take in new refugees and Israeli soldiers have shooed away dozens of protesters who had approached the frontier Tuesday, demanding protection.
Meanwhile, about 7,000 Syrians were expected to be evacuated from two pro-regime villages in northwestern Syria, ending a three-year siege by insurgents who control the surrounding area. Dozens of buses arrived in the Foua and Kfraya villages to transport the evacuees on Wednesday, Syrian state media said.
Evacuation deals have been criticized by the UN as forced displacement. A negotiated deal to evacuate Foua and Kfraya villagers earlier this year faltered after the evacuation of only 40 people from a third village. The evacuees’ first stop is the regime-controlled city of Aleppo.
Russia’s Defense Ministry said on Wednesday that Russian and Syrian authorities had set up a refugee center in Syria to help refugees return home from abroad.