Rebel Wilson to give record defamation payout to charity

Actress Rebel Wilson arrives at the Vanity Fair Oscar Party in Beverly Hills, California, on February 28, 2016. (File photo by Reuters)
Updated 14 September 2017
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Rebel Wilson to give record defamation payout to charity

SYDNEY: Hollywood actor Rebel Wilson has vowed to hand the largest defamation payout in Australian history to charity, as she works to get her career back on track after a “long, hard” battle.
The 37-year-old “Pitch Perfect” star successfully sued Bauer Media over magazine articles which claimed she had lied about her age and background to further her acting career.
On Wednesday, a judge awarded her Aus$4.5 million ($3.6 million) in damages against the Australian publisher — a record sum, her lawyers said.
“I’m looking forward to helping out some great Australian charities and supporting the Oz film industry with the damages I’ve received,” Wilson tweeted.
“Also looking forward to getting back to my career and entertaining everyone!“
Bauer had argued the allegations made in Woman’s Day, Australian Women’s Weekly and OK Magazine in 2015 were true and denied they had damaged Wilson’s reputation.
But Justice John Dixon said Bauer had “acted in its own corporate interests to secure improved circulation, or increased views/hits” in his ruling.
“Justice Dixon has awarded me a record sum and I’m extremely grateful for that. It is four times the Australian record,” said Sydney-born Wilson.
“To me though, this case wasn’t about the money.”
Throughout the three-week trial, an often-emotional Wilson claimed she was sacked from DreamWorks animated feature films “Trolls” and “Kung Fu Panda 3” following the articles.
She is due to star in “Pitch Perfect 3” this year, along with a remake of comedy classic “Dirty Rotten Scoundrels.”


Finland tops global happiness index for second consecutive year

Updated 20 March 2019
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Finland tops global happiness index for second consecutive year

  • The World Happiness Report ranks 156 countries by how happy their citizens see themselves to be
  • Happiness has declined the most drastically in the past ten years in the 108th placed Venezuela

HELSINKI: Finland has topped an index of the happiest nations for the second consecutive year, with researchers saying the small Nordic country has succeeded in generating a happiness recipe not simply dependent on economic wealth.
The World Happiness Report, produced by the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network, ranks 156 countries by how happy their citizens see themselves to be. It’s based on factors including economic wealth, life expectancy, social support and freedom to make life choices.
The index, published Wednesday, showed the other Nordic countries did well, with Denmark, Norway and Iceland taking the next spots.
The United States dropped from the 18th to 19th place.
Happiness has declined the most drastically in the past ten years in the 108th placed Venezuela, currently in political crisis.