Typhoon Talim veers away from Taiwan, moves toward Japan

Sandbags are prepared ahead of Typhoon Talim in a landmark building Taipei 101 in Taipei, Taiwan, on September 13, 2017. (File photo by Reuters)
Updated 14 September 2017
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Typhoon Talim veers away from Taiwan, moves toward Japan

TAIPEI: Taiwan will lift a shipping warning later on Thursday after Typhoon Talim veered away from the island and moved toward Japan but the capital, Taipei, and other cities can expect heavy rains from the storm, meteorologists said.
Some flight cancelations could also still be expected as northern Taiwan is lashed by heavy rain.
Talim had gained in strength since Wednesday as it approached Taiwan’s northern cities, according to the Central Weather Bureau (CWB), but it has now shifted north and will not make landfall in Taiwan.
It also might not hit the Chinese mainland as it veers toward Japan, the bureau said.
Japan’s southern Ryukyu Islands have begun to feel the effects, with reports that strong winds and heavy rainfall have caused power outages as the typhoon churns in the sea between Taiwan and Japan with maximum sustained wind speeds at sea of 173 km/h (107 mph) and gusts of up to 209 km/h (130 mph).
The bureau said bad weather associated with the storm will still be felt in the north and northeast of Taiwan on Thursday.
“The effects of Talim have been less severe than many international weather authorities predicted, including those of us in Taiwan, the US, China and Japan,” said CWB forecaster Wang Chun-hsien.
Talim had been expected to move toward China, where more than 200,000 people in Fujian and Zhejiang provinces have been evacuated, China’s official Xinhua news agency said.
The CWB’s current forecast projected the storm to veer northeast toward Japan’s western coast. However, it could change course again.
China Airlines and EVA Airways, Taiwan’s two largest carriers, said they would cancel some international flights later on Thursday due to the storm’s proximity.
Typhoons are a seasonal routine for Taiwan, but the island has stepped up preparations since Typhoon Morakat in 2009. Morakat was the deadliest typhoon to hit the island in recorded history, killing close to 700 people, most in landslides.


Zambia probes mine dump collapse that killed 10

Updated 26 min 39 sec ago
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Zambia probes mine dump collapse that killed 10

  • Zambia’s mining minister Richard Musukwa blamed the incident, which also left seven people injured, on “people who should not have been in the mine,” describing them as “illegal miners or scavengers.”
  • Ministers were forced to step in last month after small-scale miners at the site began using explosives to extract copper from the mine dump, damaging nearby properties and possibly dislodging the mound.

LUSAKA: Zambia’s mining minister Richard Musukwa announced an investigation on Thursday after 10 people died during the collapse of a mine dump in the country’s copper-producing region.
The subsistence miners were killed on Wednesday when the dump known locally as Black Mountain collapsed in Zambia’s second-largest city and mining hub Kitwe.
Musukwa told parliament “the investigations are still underway and we have suspended operations at the Black Mountain to allow for a forensic investigation.”
Musukwa blamed the incident, which also left seven people injured, on “people who should not have been in the mine,” describing them as “illegal miners or scavengers.”
Local media reported that ministers were forced to step in last month after small-scale miners at the site began using explosives to extract copper from the mine dump, damaging nearby properties and possibly dislodging the mound.
Zambia has some of the world’s largest copper reserves and the metal accounts for as much as 80 percent of the country’s export earnings.
Growing demand for copper has seen prices spike above $3.14 (€2.74) for a pound, according to the InfoMine service.
This has contributed to a surge in illegal mining activity in Zambia which is beset by high levels of unemployment.
Communications and power cables have become a valuable target, both for major gangs and small-time thieves both in Zambia and worldwide.