Suicide attacks kill at least 15 in south Iraqi city – police, medics

An Iraqi security forces member inspects the site of suicide bombings at a power plant north of the capital Baghdad on September 2, 2017. Armed with grenades and wearing explosives belts, three attackers entered the facility in Samarra, about 100 kilometres (62 miles) north of the capital, at 2:00 am, an Iraqi security official told AFP, adding that the suicide bombers killed seven people and wounded 12 in the attack. (AFP)
Updated 15 September 2017
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Suicide attacks kill at least 15 in south Iraqi city – police, medics

BAGHDAD: Suicide bombers attacked a restaurant and a police checkpoint on a highway near the southern Iraqi city of Nassiriya on Thursday, killing at least 15 and wounding many, police and medical sources said.
One attacker detonated his explosive vest inside the restaurant, south-west of Nassiriya, while three to four other attackers opened fire at the people inside, police sources said.
Sources at city hospitals said four Iranian citizens were among those killed. Police said the death toll could rise as several of the wounded were in a critical condition.
Bomb attacks in southern Iraq, where the bulk of the country’s oil is produced, are relatively rare.
No group immediately claimed responsibility, but the attack occurred with Iraqi forces battling to defeat Daesh militants in areas under their control.


UAE minister: Arab coalition’s full control of Hodeidah only a matter of time

Updated 9 min 42 sec ago
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UAE minister: Arab coalition’s full control of Hodeidah only a matter of time

  • Gargash, speaking to reporters in Dubai, estimated the number of Houthi fighters in Hodeidah at between 2,000 to 3,000
  • The UN envoy for Yemen carried a plan to halt fighting around the key aid port of Hodeidah where Houthi militia have been battling a regional coalition as he arrived Saturday in the militia-held capital Sanaa

DUBAI: The Saudi-led coalition fighting Iran-aligned Houthis for control of Yemen’s main port city of Hodeidah will take a “calculated and gradual” approach to the battle, a senior United Arab Emirates official said on Monday.

The comments came after witnesses said eight villagers had been killed and 15 others wounded when Houthi militia shelled a village in the center of the country called Haglan Maris.

Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said the military alliance led by Saudi Arabia and the UAE was taking into consideration a “fragile humanitarian situation,” avoiding civilian casualties in addition to military calculations.

Gargash, speaking to reporters in Dubai, estimated the number of Houthi fighters in Hodeidah at between 2,000 to 3,000. He declined to reveal the size of coalition forces but said they had “numerical superiority.”

He said that the Arab coalition’s full control of Hodeidah only a matter of time.

Gargash added that the Hodeidah port is a “major artery” for weapons smuggling from Iran to the Houthis.

“The liberation of Hodeidah is a major step in freeing Sanaa,” the UAE minister said, adding that “the roads leading to the port are filled with mines.”

France is said to be helping the Arab coalition in demining the roads.

“We have opened the road from Hodeidah to Sanaa to allow the militias to flee without resistance,” Gargash said.

The UN envoy for Yemen carried a plan to halt fighting around the key aid port of Hodeidah where Houthi militia have been battling a regional coalition as he arrived Saturday in the militia-held capital Sanaa for emergency talks.

Martin Griffiths was expected to propose to militia leaders that they cede control of the Red Sea port to a UN-supervised committee and halt heavy clashes against advancing government troops backed by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.

(With AFP, AP & Reuters)