Oman’s Qasabi might not have been 127, but he still led an impressive life

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Salim bin Hamad bin Abdullah Qasabi
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Salim bin Hamad bin Abdullah Qasabi
Updated 14 September 2017
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Oman’s Qasabi might not have been 127, but he still led an impressive life

DUBAI: The family of Salim bin Hamad bin Abdullah Qasabi — the man who reportedly lived until he was 127 — have spoken out, saying he was in fact not the oldest person in the world.
According to the Times of Oman he was a few years younger, but nonetheless, lived to an impressive age.
“Our grandfather was not 127,” Abdullah Al-Qasabi, the deceased’s grandson told the website.
Instead, he said his grandfather was actually 110 when he died.

Qasabi fathered nine children – he outlived six, who sadly died before him. He also had 34 grandchildren and 42 great-grandchildren.
And according to the Times of Oman, the age difference between him and his youngest great grandchild was 109 years and 10 months.

While the newspaper, the Oman Daily Observer incorrectly reported his age as 127, his actual age of 110 was still impressive and does place him among some of the oldest known people to have lived.
Qasabi’s father lived until he was 95, although this is unconfirmed as there was no birth certificate, the report added and the same was the case for himself.
However while there was no birth certificate recording Qasabi’s arrival, there was a Certificate of Appreciation Age, produced by the Omani government.

“During that time there was no such thing as a birth certificate, but we calculated his age based on the information we know of his father. The age difference between our grandfather Salim and his father is 16 years, which would make our father 110 at the time of his death.” Abdullah added.

Qasabi died after a fall, in which he broke his thigh, Abdullah was quoted as saying.
“When we sent him to the hospital it was discovered that he had to undergo an operation,” he added.
“After the tests, the results showed that he had many infections, including a chest infection, and they had to give him a breathing pipe. The hospital waited for him to get better, but his condition became unstable and he passed away on September 11.”

Abdullah explained that his grandfather was born in the turn of the last century in 1907.
“Throughout the years, my grandfather has always been a happy person, kind to people. He worked hard to provide for his family,” Abdullah, 38, added.

He said he believed his grandfather’s longevity was probably due to several factors. He said he was always asleep by 9 p.m. and would wake every morning Fajir prayers.
And he said his grandfather had dates and coffee every day.

“Walking and being active could also, be a factor,” Abdullah said. “He never liked using cars, he was very active and sociable, people enjoyed having his company.”


Han Solo’s ‘Return of the Jedi’ blaster sells for $550,000

Updated 24 June 2018
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Han Solo’s ‘Return of the Jedi’ blaster sells for $550,000

  • The faux weapon, mainly made of wood, had been put on display in New York by Julien’s Auctions last month after more than 30 years tucked away in the belongings of James Schoppe, art director of “Return of the Jedi”
  • Martin Nolan, the auction house’s executive director, said Schoppe, an Oscar nominee for his work on the film, finally decided to part with Solo’s gun and about 40 other items from the movie, including an Ewok axe and plans for Jabba the Hutt’s ship

WASHINGTON: In the wildly popular “Star Wars” films, Han Solo once told a lightsaber-wielding Luke Skywalker: “Hokey religions and ancient weapons are no match for a good blaster at your side, kid.”
That was the case when one of the blaster pistol props used by Harrison Ford in “Return of the Jedi” (1983) went under the hammer, selling for $550,000 — topping the $450,000 previously fetched by Skywalker’s lightsaber from the first two films.
“SOLD for $550,000! An original Han Solo blaster used in Star Wars: Return of the Jedi!” Julien’s Auctions announced on Twitter Saturday.
The faux weapon, mainly made of wood, had been put on display in New York by Julien’s Auctions last month after more than 30 years tucked away in the belongings of James Schoppe, art director of “Return of the Jedi.”
Martin Nolan, the auction house’s executive director, said Schoppe, an Oscar nominee for his work on the film, finally decided to part with Solo’s gun and about 40 other items from the movie, including an Ewok axe and plans for Jabba the Hutt’s ship.
The Ewok axe went for $11,250, while another blaster prop from the film fetched $90,624, according to Julien’s Auctions.
But none of the props were a match for the space saga’s much-loved droid: last year, an R2-D2 used in the making of several “Star Wars” films sold for $2.76 million at auction in Los Angeles.