Philippines balances sound fundamentals against risks, Moody’s says

An interagency panel headed by Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte this week approved four major infrastructure projects worth $7.59 billion. (Reuters)
Updated 15 September 2017
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Philippines balances sound fundamentals against risks, Moody’s says

DUBAI: Moody’s Investors Service on Friday said that the Philippines’ credit profile balances sound economic and fiscal fundamentals against structural challenges to competitiveness and rising political risks.
The ratings agency, in a recently-released annual credit analysis, expects the Southeast Asian nation to sustain its robust economic growth over the next few years, boosted by the government’s focus on infrastructure development, buoyant private sector investment and the recovery in external demand.
“We project real GDP growth to be broadly stable in the remainder of 2017 and to average 6.5 percent for the year as a whole, which is at the lower end of the government’s forecast range of 6.5 percent and 7.5 percent,” Moody’s said.
An interagency panel headed by Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte this week approved four major infrastructure projects worth $7.59 billion, including bridges, roads and the country’s first subway.
The current administration plans to spend $175.7 billion over the next five years for its ambitious Build, Build, Build program on what it calls the Golden Age of Infrastructure. Moody’s however believes the government will pare back its infrastructure spending plan pending passage of the Philippine tax reform legislation.
“We have also retained our projection for 2018 at 6.8 percent, below the government’s target of 7 percent and 8 percent given continued uncertainties regarding the proposed comprehensive tax reform program, which is currently being considered by the upper house of Congress,” Moody’s said.
“Strong GDP growth could accelerate even further, especially if the government achieves higher investment spending.”
Moody’s however cautioned that the worsening Islamist insurgency in Mindanao, which could lead to an expansion of martial law, may undermine both foreign and domestic business confidence and disrupt economic activity in other parts of the country.


Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

Updated 23 March 2019
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Apple’s Cook to China: keep opening for sake of global economy

  • Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China
  • Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets

BEIJING: Apple chief executive Tim Cook nudged China on Saturday to open up and said the future would depend on global collaboration, as the United States and China remained locked in a bitter trade dispute.
“We encourage China to continue to open up, we see that as essential, not only for China to reach its full potential, but for the global economy to thrive,” Cook said at a China Development Forum in Beijing.
Despite official pledges and repeated assurances that China would continue to open its markets, some analysts worry that its reform project has slowed or even stalled under President Xi Jinping, who has sought greater control over the economy and a bigger role for state-owned firms at the expense of the private sector.
Cook’s comments come as Apple weathers sinking sales in China because of a contracting smartphone market, increasing pressure from Chinese rivals, and slowing upgrade cycles. The company reported a revenue drop of 26 percent in the greater China region during the quarter ending in December.
Before those results came out, in a January letter to investors, Cook blamed the company’s poor China performance on trade tension between the United States and China, suggesting that pressure on the economy was hurting sales in China.