Emmy nominee Dolly Parton still gets a kick out of Hollywood

Dolly Parton arrives at the 69th Primetime Emmy Awards Variety and Women in Film pre-Emmy celebration on Friday in Los Angeles. (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP)
Updated 16 September 2017
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Emmy nominee Dolly Parton still gets a kick out of Hollywood

WEST HOLLYWOOD: Dolly Parton says she is excited to be in the Hollywood mix on Emmy Awards weekend.
The 71-year-old entertainer was among the stars making the pre-show party rounds Friday with a stop at Variety and Women in Film’s gathering at Gracias Madre restaurant in West Hollywood, California.
“All the parties, seeing all the stars... I still get a kick out of it,” Parton said. “I am a country girl.”
Wearing a skin-tight black rhinestone-studded dress, Parton said she’s also excited about her gown and wig for Sunday’s show. She is up for an Emmy in the TV movie category for “Dolly Parton’s Christmas of Many Colors: Circle of Love.”
Parton’s weekend was not all about fancy parties, though. She said she spent some time in the kitchen earlier Friday.
“Well, I made some sausage and biscuits for my trip home on the bus after the shows are over. And I made some chicken and dumplings, a few little groceries that I put together,” she said. “See, I travel in my tour bus and I always cook my own food. So that was not very glamorous, but it was good.”
There is no word on whether Parton indulged in the snacks served at the party, which included mini empanadas and cheese-filled roasted figs. Viola Davis partook in the ice cream sundae bar, topping her scoop with frosted animal cookies.
Meanwhile, stars packed the restaurant’s patio. Gabrielle Union and Dwyane Wade chatted with friends, “The Handmaid’s Tale” star Samira Wiley held hands with her wife, and Kate Flannery hugged William H. Macy as he and Felicity Huffman made their way through the crowd.
Other guests included Sarah Hyland, Tracee Ellis Ross, Lea Michele, Judith Light, Claire Foy and Brian Tyree Henry.
The television academy also held a party Friday night for acting nominees, where John Turturro, Angela Bassett and Laverne Cox were among the guests.


Japan's crown prince hopes to continue father's legacy

In this Feb. 17, 2019, photo provided by the Imperial Household Agency of Japan, Japan's Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako pose for a photo at their residence Togu Palace in Tokyo. Naruhito celebrates his 59th birthday on Saturday, Feb. 23, 2019. (AP)
Updated 23 February 2019
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Japan's crown prince hopes to continue father's legacy

  • The Japanese throne is only inherited by male heirs, and Naruhito's only child is a daughter. Prince Akishino and his young son Hisahito are next in the line of succession after Naruhito

TOKYO: Japanese Crown Prince Naruhito says he hopes to continue the close relationship his father built with the people when he succeeds him as emperor later this year.
Naruhito, who turns 59 on Saturday, will ascend the Chrysanthemum Throne on May 1 after Emperor Akihito abdicates.
"I feel very solemn when I think about the future," he said at an annual pre-birthday news conference Thursday. His remarks were embargoed from publication until Saturday.
"While I continue to prepare for this role, I would like to maintain the past emperors' work. I would like to think about the people and pray for the people," he said.
His wife, Masako will also assume a new role as empress. The former diplomat has suffered from stress and has often skipped public events, and it's unclear how she will manage her new role as empress.
"Although Masako is steadily recovering, her condition still fluctuates. I would like Masako to continue to slowly widen her contribution in her role," Naruhito said, adding he hopes to support his wife just as she has supported him.
Naruhito's younger brother, Prince Akishino, and his family are also expected to play a major role. The Japanese throne is only inherited by male heirs, and Naruhito's only child is a daughter. Prince Akishino and his young son Hisahito are next in the line of succession after Naruhito.
Akihito's desire to leave the throne revived a debate about the country's 2,000-year-old monarchy, one of the world's oldest, as well as discussion about improving the status of female members of the shrinking royal population.
"This problem will relate to the imperial family of the future. I would like to refrain from giving any opinions on the system," the crown prince said.
Those who are concerned about the future of the royal family with shrinking membership want to allow women to ascend the throne and others to keep their royal status so they can keep performing public duties, but a government panel has avoided the divisive issue.
Even before the 1947 Imperial Law, reigning empresses were rare, usually serving as stand-ins for a few years until a suitable male can be installed. The last reigning empress was Gosakuramachi, who assumed the throne in 1763.
Debate over the succession law, however, is emotional. Some conservatives proposed a revival of concubines to produce imperial heirs, and others argued that allowing a woman on the throne would destroy a precious Japanese tradition.