Japan restaurant highlights dementia awareness

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Diners have no complaints about the service at a pop-up restaurant in central Tokyo, where the 17 waiters and waitresses all suffer from dementia. (Photo courtesy: social media)
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Professional cooks prepared the dishes for diners who were required to register in advance, at a venue in Roppongi’s Ark Hills complex. The organizers included a dementia nursing care home. (Photo courtesy: social media)
Updated 17 September 2017
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Japan restaurant highlights dementia awareness

TOKYO: Diners have no complaints about the service at a pop-up restaurant in central Tokyo, where the 17 waiters and waitresses all suffer from dementia.
“The Restaurant of Order Mistakes” — a play on the title of a classic Japanese children’s book, “The Restaurant of Many Orders” — is the brainchild of NHK television director Shiro Oguni, 38.
The goal of his project, scheduled to run Sep. 16-18, is to raise awareness about dementia ahead of World Alzheimer’s Day on Sept. 21, and allow the public to interact with those who have the condition in a safe environment in which the servers need not fear the consequences of any errors they might make.
“It was truly great that everyone believed that they would be able to do this job, as long as they had proper support in place,” Ogino said.
Makoto Ichikawa, a customer, said he enjoyed talking to a waitress who briefly forgot her role and sat down across from him to chat.
Professional cooks prepared the dishes for diners who were required to register in advance, at a venue in Roppongi’s Ark Hills complex. The organizers included a dementia nursing care home.
Following the success of a similar pop-up restaurant in June, Ogino turned to crowd-funding to back the event, which he hopes to hold annually.
Japan is a global frontrunner in confronting dementia, the cost of which has been estimated at one percent of the world’s gross domestic product.
Both public and private initiatives have sought to erase the stigma of the disorder that affects nearly 5 million Japanese citizens. One in five Japanese aged 65 or over, or some 7 million people, are forecast to have some degree of dementia by 2025.


Diabetes: A ‘ticking time bomb’ for Saudi Arabia

Saudi Arabia has an 18.5 percent prevalence rate in the adult population, which ranks the country among the top 10 in the world with the highest prevalence of diabetes. (SPA)
Updated 13 November 2018
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Diabetes: A ‘ticking time bomb’ for Saudi Arabia

  • “Only 24 percent of respondents fully agreed that their current lifestyle is healthy and only 7 percent agreed that their current diet is healthy,” explained the survey

RIYADH: Saudi Arabia is sitting on a diabetes time bomb. The number of cases has exceeded 3.8 million and a huge majority of sufferers have no knowledge about the illness and its association with cardiovascular diseases. Type 2 diabetes is at an all-time high in the Kingdom, affecting the quality of life, including productivity.
A survey conducted by the Saudi Scientific Diabetes Society (SSDS) said that “more than 52 percent of patients with type 2 diabetes die of cardiovascular causes.”
The Kingdom has an 18.5 percent prevalence rate in the adult population, which ranks the country among the top 10 in the world with the highest prevalence of diabetes,” said the survey.
Speaking during the presentation of the survey, Dr. Saud Al-Sifri, vice president of the SSDS, said: “Type 2 diabetes is a serious epidemic, not just in Saudi Arabia but around the world … despite numerous efforts, awareness levels remain low around the knowledge gaps within type 2 diabetes management and cardiovascular disease risk implications ... Patients with type 2 diabetes are at an increased risk of developing heart disease.”
He advised patients to go for “regular checkups and have open conversations with their doctors. Given the importance and relationship between CVD and diabetes, there are new classes for type 2 diabetes treatment that have shown significant improvement in cardiovascular outcome trials,” said Al-Sifri, urging all stakeholders to address the issue Kingdom-wide.
The survey, which was carried out by the SSDS in collaboration with Ipsos, a global market research and consulting firm, said that “52 percent of the patients perceive obesity to be more serious than type 2 diabetes, confirming that increasing public awareness about a specific disease alters their perception.” In fact, 45 percent of respondents did not discuss cardiovascular disease’s association with physicians, it added.
“Only 24 percent of respondents fully agreed that their current lifestyle is healthy and only 7 percent agreed that their current diet is healthy,” explained the survey.