All eyes on Britain’s May as she prepares to spell out key Brexit demands

PM Theresa May is to spell out key positions on Brexit in a speech in Florence, Italy, on Sept 22, 2017. (AFP)
Updated 22 September 2017
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All eyes on Britain’s May as she prepares to spell out key Brexit demands

LONDON: European leaders braced on Friday for a speech by British Prime Minister Theresa May that is expected to spell out key positions on Brexit after wrangling and tension in her own government.
With the clock ticking toward Britain’s departure from the EU on March 29, 2019, May’s address in Florence, Italy seeks to break a deadlock in negotiations whose fourth round starts next week.
Among the many issues dividing the two sides, money dominates.
Britain has yet to agree on — or even say — how much it will pay the European Union on departure, a position that for Brussels blocks any talks on a potential future trade deal.
On the eve of her speech, May met with cabinet ministers for more than two hours to finalize Britain’s position.
Ministers have been at odds over crucial issues such as a potential transition deal and future access to the EU single market as well as the Brexit bill.
The tensions exploded into public view last week when Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson laid out his own vision for life outside the EU.
He argued for a sharp break with the bloc, a stance that dismays moderates who fear this will wreck Britain’s relations with the world’s biggest trade bloc.
In doing so, he was accused of trying to tie the hands of May, whose hold on power remains fragile since losing her parliamentary majority in the June election.
Six months after May began the two-year countdown to Britain’s withdrawal, EU leaders are still waiting for details on what she wants from the divorce.
Michel Barnier, the EU’s chief negotiator, on Thursday ramped up the pressure.
“To make progress, we are waiting for clear commitments from the UK on these precise issues. We will listen attentively and constructively to Theresa May’s important speech,” he said.
Reports suggest May will include an offer on Britain’s financial obligations and a proposal for a two-year transition into a new deal with the EU.
Barnier said such a period would begin on March 30, 2019 but pointed to the detailed deal-making effort needed to make it happen.
“Logically this would require existing union regulatory, budgetary, supervisory, judiciary and enforcement instruments and structures to apply,” he said.
Downing Street said the speech would “also discuss a vision for a bold new economic and security partnership and set out the prime minister’s plan for a time-limited implementation period.”
The divorce bill will be a key issue in upcoming talks.
British media reports say May would accept a 20-billion-euro ($23.9-billion) payment during the transition in return for access to the single market.
The EU, though, is demanding Britain pay for budget commitments made but not yet paid, including contributions for infrastructure projects in poorer member states and pensions for EU officials.
May was expected to say that a deal would ensure that “when this chapter of our European history is written, it will be remembered not for the differences we faced, but for the vision we showed.”
“While the UK’s departure from the EU is inevitably a difficult process, it is in all of our interests for our negotiations to succeed,” she will say, according to extracts released from her Downing Street office.
The prime minister’s upcoming speech was trailed as “May’s vision for Brexit victory” by the Daily Express, an anti-EU newspaper, while the Daily Mail front page read: “PM’s bold bid to end Brexit deadlock.”
EU officials will scrutinize the May speech for any signs of progress on other potential deal-breakers — the rights of European citizens in Britain, and how Britain will settle the question of the inner Irish border.
Business leaders will be vetting details on the transitional deal, which would bridge the gap between Britain’s exit and the implementation of new trading arrangements with the EU.
Miles Celic, chief executive of The City UK, the lobby group for the financial sector, said it was “crunch time.”
“Many firms are already moving parts of their operations out of the UK and Europe. When they’ve gone, it’s hard to see them coming back,” he said.


Singapore spent $12 million on US-N.Korea summit

Updated 30 min 16 sec ago
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Singapore spent $12 million on US-N.Korea summit

  • $12 million were spent on the historic US-North Korea summit
  • The meeting was the culmination of a rapid detente between Pyongyang and Washington

SINGAPORE: Singapore said Sunday it spent Sg$16.3 million ($12 million) on the historic US-North Korea summit, adding it was less than initially anticipated after some in the city-state complained about the high cost.
US President Donald Trump and the North’s leader Kim Jong Un met in Singapore on June 12 for talks aimed at ending a tense nuclear standoff.
The meeting was the culmination of a rapid detente between Pyongyang and Washington and saw Kim commit to working toward denuclearization, although critics noted the summit agreement was vague and non-binding.
Singapore, an affluent financial hub, was seen as a good choice for the summit due to its warm ties with both the US and North Korea, and reputation for strict order.
But some Singaporeans thought welcoming the mercurial leaders was more an annoyance than an honor, particularly when Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong estimated the tiny state would have to shell out Sg$20 million ($14.7 million) to host the meeting.
However in the end, the cost incurred by the government was about Sg$16.3 million, the biggest part of which was spent on security, said a ministry of foreign affairs spokesman in a statement.
It noted that Singapore had “supported the international efforts to achieve peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula.”
Tightly-controlled Singapore rolled out a massive security operation for the meeting, deploying thousands of police, setting up road-blocks and banning flares and loudhailers near summit venues to prevent protests.
As well as the security operation, the Singapore government footed the bill for the delegation from the sanctions-hit North, including Kim’s stay at the luxury St. Regis hotel, according to the BBC.
They would have also had to pay a substantial amount for facilities for the huge number of journalists that covered the summit.
The clampdown was disruptive for many residents in the usually placid city-state of 5.6 million — although some observers said hosting the summit amounted to a PR coup that would ultimately benefit Singapore.