EU leaders want clarity on citizens, Brexit financial terms and Ireland

French President Emmanuel Macron said that rules on the settlement of EU citizens, the financial terms of Britain’s departure from the bloc and the question of Ireland must be clarified before other issues can be tackled. (Reuters)
Updated 23 September 2017
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EU leaders want clarity on citizens, Brexit financial terms and Ireland

PARIS: French President Emmanuel Macron said on Friday that in Brexit talks, rules on the settlement of EU citizens, the financial terms of Britain’s departure from the bloc, and the question of Ireland must be clarified before other issues can be tackled.
Polish Prime Minister Beata Szydlo sounded a similar tune, reacting to a speech by British Prime Minister Theresa May in Florence, Italy, during which she laid out Britain’s ambitions after leaving the bloc.
“Before we move forward, we want to clarify matters concerning the settlement of European citizens, the financial terms of exit and the question of Ireland,” Macron said in a joint briefing after a visit by Finnish Prime Minister Juha Sipila to Paris.
“If these three points are not clarified, we will not be able to advance on the rest,” Macron said.
Szydlo said that for Poland the key issue was the rights of Polish citizens in Britain, and that Britain must also fulfill its financial obligations.
The EU’s chief Brexit negotiator, Michel Barnier, said in a statement that May’s speech showed willingness to move forward.


Scottish government wins fracking case against energy giant Ineos

Updated 6 min 22 sec ago
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Scottish government wins fracking case against energy giant Ineos

  • The devolved government said a moratorium on fracking was in place
  • neos had argued that the ban was imposed unlawfully

EDINBURGH: Scotland’s highest court has ruled in favor of a government ban on fracking which had been challenged by energy giant Ineos, the Scottish government said on Tuesday.
“This decision vindicates the extensive process of research and consultation which the Scottish government has undertaken since 2015,” Scottish business minister Paul Wheelhouse said in a statement. “Our preferred position is not to support unconventional oil and gas extraction in Scotland (fracking), and that position remains unchanged.”
The devolved government said a moratorium on fracking — gas extraction via hydraulic fracturing of the ground — was in place. That meant no local authority could grant planning permission until an impact assessment process had been carried out.
Ineos had argued that the ban was imposed unlawfully, and that it contradicted evidence that shale gas could be produced safely by unconventional methods.
Scotland decided to outlaw fracking in October after a public consultation found overwhelming opposition to it.