Sushi Centro: Jeddah’s latest Japanese restaurant is fresh, funky, affordable

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If you are looking for a restaurant that serves fresh, tasty and affordable sushi, Sushi Centro is the place. (Photographs by: Huda Bashatah)
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If you are looking for a restaurant that serves fresh, tasty and affordable sushi, Sushi Centro is the place. (Photographs by: Huda Bashatah)
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If you are looking for a restaurant that serves fresh, tasty and affordable sushi, Sushi Centro is the place. (Photographs by: Huda Bashatah)
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Updated 08 October 2017
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Sushi Centro: Jeddah’s latest Japanese restaurant is fresh, funky, affordable

JEDDAH: Sushi is healthy but tends to be expensive, and requires expertise to prepare properly.
So if you are looking for a restaurant that serves fresh, tasty and affordable sushi, Sushi Centro on Al-Madinah Al-Munawarah Road in Al-Sharafeyah, Jeddah, is the place.
The restaurant is in the Centro Shaheen Hotel, and has a comfortable, modern ambiance that is young and fresh in its approach, original in its presentation and dynamic in its offerings. It offers a range of quick and healthy food, as well as a takeaway service.
Sushi Centro’s fresh and tasty prawn tempura with daikon sauce will entice your senses as the crunchy shrimps make noise when you bite into them. Its salmon tartar with avocado and sliced onions is simply a joy.
Sushi Centro offers three types of Bento Box — teriyaki, seared salmon and crispy vegetable spring rolls — ranging in price from SR65 ($17) to SR120.
For dessert, the restaurant offers a festive hand-cut fruit mix of fresh mango, dragon fruit, pineapple, melon and lychee.
Sushi Centro is a new take on contemporary Japanese cuisine, with a funky vibe for casual dining. It is open for lunch from noon until 3:30 p.m., and for dinner from 7 p.m. until 11:30 p.m.
The restaurant is within walking distance of Haifaa Mall, major commercial centers, traditional markets, consulates and ministries. It is only five minutes’ drive from Jeddah Corniche.


Jordan charity gathers hotel leftovers to feed poor

Updated 13 June 2018
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Jordan charity gathers hotel leftovers to feed poor

  • A team of volunteers collect unwanted food from lavish Ramadan buffets
  • Bandar Sharif began his ‘Family Kitchen’ initiative 10 years ago

AMMAN: At the end of a lavish Ramadan buffet in the banquet hall of one of Amman’s five-star hotels, a young Jordanian charity worker rushes to gather up left-over food that his team of volunteers will package and redistribute to needy families.
Bandar Sharif began his ‘Family Kitchen’ initiative 10 years ago, angered by the amount of food thrown away by hotels during the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan, traditionally a period when consumption levels double across the region.
“What we do is eliminate this waste, we salvage the food and provide it to people who are in desperate need of it,” said Sharif, a 33-year-old teacher.
His team of volunteers now works all year round to collect unwanted food from large wedding parties, bakeries and restaurants.
This year the initiative has focused on the Palestinian refugee camp of Baqaa, one of the depressed areas in a country that has seen some of the biggest protests in years this month over steep price hikes, which are backed by the International Monetary Fund.
Critics say the price hikes are to blame for rising poverty in Jordan.
Family Kitchen’s initiative this year provides ‘iftar’ meals — eaten by Muslims after sunset during the holy month of Ramadan — to 500 families in the impoverished refugee camp on the outskirts of Amman.
A third of the camp’s 120,000 residents have an income below the national poverty line and around 17 percent are unemployed, the UN refugee body says.
“Our families are very poor, there is a lot of poverty in the community, so they need this support, they need these meals in order to ensure that they have food the next day,” said Kifah Khamis, who runs a charity in the sprawling camp.
One camp resident, Um Thair, a mother of four, said she could not have coped without the meals delivered to her family.
“I was able to save money. During Ramadan I didn’t have to buy a lot of food or shop a lot, we got most of our meals from the charity, we would come everyday and get our iftar meal,” she said.