SAMA to launch virtual riyal for banks

Updated 06 October 2017
0

SAMA to launch virtual riyal for banks

JEDDAH: The Saudi Arabian Monetary Agency (SAMA) will implement a pilot project to issue a virtual/digital currency that will be traded exclusively among banks to avoid any economic impact, SAMA Governor Ahmed Al-Khulaifi has revealed.
SAMA will also study the positive aspects of the practice and consider whether or not it will continue.
Al-Khulaifi ruled out any plan to issue a digital currency for trading between individuals and companies, adding that the Saudi banknotes currency will be dispensed with the coins.
Quoted by Al-Hayat daily, Al-Khulaifi said in a press conference at SAMA headquarters in Riyadh on Wednesday that "The Saudi Riyals banknotes currency will be dispensed and one Riyal category will be issued into coins instead in the next stage."
He also confirmed that SAMA "provided all equipment needed for the issuance and circulation of the Riyal coins as it will be available at the headquarters of the agency, its branches and the entire banking sector."
Al-Khulaifi was surprised by the decline experienced by the Saudi riyals in futures exchange. He said he sees no reason for that as he described liquidity in the banking system as good.
He pointed out that "private consumption expenditure exceeded trillion riyals last year, an increase of 5 percent compared to 2015, while government consumption expenditure amounted to SAR16 billion."
He also disclosed that the average per capita private consumption amounted to SAR33,000 last year.
He described SAMA's reserve assets as "still good, it amounted to SAR1.8 trillion in August. They cover more than 30 months of Saudi imports of goods and services and account for more than 70 percent of GDP."


Oil theft ‘costing Libya over $750m annually’

Updated 41 min 41 sec ago
0

Oil theft ‘costing Libya over $750m annually’

  • Libya’s oil sector collapsed in the wake of the 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime dictator Muammar Qaddafi.
  • The recovery of oil production and exports is key to restoring Libya’s economy.

Tripoli: Fuel smuggling is costing Libya more than $750 million each year and harming its economy and society, the head of the National Oil Company in the conflict-riddled country said.
“The impact of fuel smuggling is destroying the fabric of the country,” NOC president Mustafa Sanalla said according to the text of a speech delivered on Wednesday at a conference on oil and fuel theft in Geneva.
“The fuel smugglers and thieves have permeated not only the militias which control much of Libya, but also the fuel distribution companies which are supposed to bring cheap fuel to Libyan citizens,” he said.
“The huge sums of money available from smuggling have corrupted large parts of Libyan society,” he added.
The backbone of the North African country’s economy, Libya’s oil sector collapsed in the wake of the 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime dictator Muammar Qaddafi.
Before the revolt Libya, with estimated oil reserves of 48 billion barrels, used to produce 1.6 million barrels per day (bpd).
But output fell to less than 500,000 bpd between 2014 and 2016 due to violence around production facilities and export terminals as rival militias fought for control of Africa’s largest crude reserves.
No oil was exported from Libya’s main ports until September 2016 with the reopening of the Ras Lanuf terminal in the country’s so-called oil crescent.
The recovery of oil production and exports is key to restoring Libya’s moribund economy.
Sanalla urged Libya’s “friends, neighbors but above all the Libyan people themselves... to do everything they can... to eradicate the scourge of fuel theft and fuel smuggling.”