Skype blocked in Qatar, but no explanation given

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Updated 06 October 2017
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Skype blocked in Qatar, but no explanation given

DUBAI: The online voice and video call service Skype has confirmed that it has been blocked in Qatar.
A message posted on the site’s FAQ section said the app was being stopped by Internet service providers (ISPs) in Qatar.
The statement added that there was “very little Skype can do about this situation.”

“The best course of action,” the statement reads, “would be for you to speak to your ISP and ask why they are blocking Skype and request that they unblock our site and services.”
The announcement from Skype follows a message Viber sent to its users in September stating that their service was “now unblocked” following a software update.
People in Qatar noticed problems in August when trying to access WhatsApp, Viber, Skype and Facetime.
There has been no formal comment from the telecom service providers.
But Ooredoo put out a statement over the Eid break carrying a denial that the company was the reason for the problem:
“Quality assurance for calling using these apps is out of Ooredoo’s control. However, we can guarantee that the issues are not from Ooredoo Super net. Eid Mubarak.”


What We Are Reading Today: Taliban Narratives — The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict

What We Are Reading Today: Taliban Narratives — The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict
Updated 21 April 2018
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What We Are Reading Today: Taliban Narratives — The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict

Two months after the 9/11 attacks and little more than a month after the Oct. 7, 2001 American-led invasion of Afghanistan, the Taliban were forced from Kabul and appeared to have been crushed.

But the fundamentalist movement proved surprisingly resilient and is now openly active in 70 percent of the country, according to the results of a January BBC survey.

Meanwhile, the occupation of Afghanistan has become the longest war in US history.

“Taliban Narratives: The Use and Power of Stories in the Afghanistan Conflict” by Thomas H. Johnson explains how and why the Taliban’s clever use of propaganda has enabled the insurgency to flourish.

As well as running their own websites and magazines, the militants have used everything from simple graffiti to poetry and self-produced DVDs to publicize their cause. In doing so, they have proved highly adept at rallying large numbers of Afghans to their side and outwitting the far more sophisticated propaganda campaigns of the US and NATO.