Man films himself atop Bali volcano, angering officials

A full moon is set behind the Mount Agung volcano in Karangasem, Bali, Indonesia, on Friday, Oct. 6, 2017. More than 140,000 people have fled from the surrounds of Mount Agung since authorities raised the volcano's alert status to the highest level on Sept. 22 after a sudden increase in tremors. It last erupted in 1963, killing more than 1,000 people. (AP Photo/Firdia Lisnawati)
Updated 06 October 2017
0

Man films himself atop Bali volcano, angering officials

JAKARTA: Indonesian authorities are urging people not to climb the active Mount Agung volcano on Bali after a video of a foreigner standing at the edge of its smoking crater circulated online.
Disaster Mitigation Agency spokesman Sutopo Purwo Nugroho said Friday that the volcano is “very dangerous” and could explode anytime. It’s been at its highest alert level since Sept. 22, sparking an exodus of more than 140,000 people from the area.
The video posted on Facebook shows a middle-aged man speaking French while plumes of steam rise from the crater he is perched above.
Nugroho said an exclusion zone that extends to 12 kilometers (7 miles) from the crater in places should not be entered.
An eruption would release lava and superheated ash and gas clouds that would speed down the mountain’s slopes, he said.
Last week, four Hindu priests angered authorities by posting a video of the crater after climbing the peak to pray.
Mount Agung last erupted in 1963, killing more than 1,100 people.


India, Pakistan foreign ministers to hold rare meeting

Updated 53 min 2 sec ago
0

India, Pakistan foreign ministers to hold rare meeting

NEW DELHI: The foreign ministers of arch-rivals India and Pakistan will hold a rare meeting on the sidelines of the UN General Assembly underway in New York, officials in New Delhi said Thursday.
The announcement comes after Pakistani Prime Minister Imran Khan wrote to his Indian counterpart Narendra Modi calling for a resumption of talks between the nuclear-armed foes.
High-level talks between India and Pakistan are rare. Indian media described the slated meeting as the first in nearly three years.
India has long accused Pakistan of arming rebel groups in Kashmir, a Himalayan territory divided between the two countries but claimed in full by both.
India also blames Pakistan for financing the deadly 2008 militant attacks in Mumbai.
A spokesman for India’s external affairs ministry said the New York tete-a-tete between Sushma Swaraj and Pakistan’s Shah Mehmood Qureshi did not represent a shift in New Delhi’s relations with Islamabad.
“This does not indicate any change in our policy on cross-border terrorism,” spokesman Raveesh Kumar told reporters in the Indian capital.
The announcement comes as the already-fraught relationship between the rivals hit fresh roadblocks this week.
The death of an Indian border guard Wednesday in Kashmir provoked outrage, with New Delhi accusing Pakistani forces of mutilating his corpse.
“It was a barbaric incident that defies logic and civilized behavior. We will take it up with Pakistan in an appropriate manner,” Kumar said.
Navjot Sidhu, an Indian cricketer-turned-politician, earlier came under fire after returning from Pakistan where he was filmed hugging the country’s army chief.