2 sides of Tim Roth on display in his pair of TV projects

AMC Networks shows Samantha Morton, left, and Tim Roth from the three-episode miniseries ‘Rillington Place.’ (AP)
Updated 06 October 2017
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2 sides of Tim Roth on display in his pair of TV projects

NEW YORK: Tim Roth can not stay out of trouble. Since his first screen appearance in 1982’s “Made in Britain” as a skinhead with a swastika tattoo on his forehead, or in 1994’s “Pulp Fiction” as a petty crook holding up a coffee shop with his girlfriend, Roth has made an art of playing villains, whack jobs and wastrels — or, at least, someone having a very bad day.
Now Roth fans can delight in two new roles that add to his canon of discord.
In Amazon Prime’s 10-episode mystery thriller “Tin Star,” Roth stars alongside Christina Hendricks (“Mad Men”) as a small-town police chief with a fearsome alter ego.
And in the three-episode miniseries “Rillington Place,” premiering Thursday on AMC Networks’ premium streaming service Sundance Now, Roth transforms himself into a sotto-voce sicko whose shy, retiring manner conceals his habit of killing young women in his section of downtrodden London.
“Rillington Place” is a masterpiece of pent-up tension and dread, with Roth virtually unrecognizable as John Christie, a real-life serial killer notorious for the carnage he committed in the 1940s and ‘50s under everyone’s noses — including his abused wife (portrayed magnificently by Samantha Morton).
“They lived in a very poor area of London, where he was everybody’s best friend and neighbor,” Roth says. “And he started to kill.” Christie would stash the bodies behind the walls or under the floorboards of his tumble-down flat.


Fuzzy crab, shiny-eyed shrimp discovered on Java expedition

Updated 19 April 2018
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Fuzzy crab, shiny-eyed shrimp discovered on Java expedition

SINGAPORE: A hermit crab, a shiny-eyed shrimp and a crab with fuzzy spines are among over a dozen new species discovered in a deep-sea expedition off the Indonesian island of Java, scientists said.
The team from the National University of Singapore (NUS) and the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI) carried out the expedition for 14 days between March and early April.
The area covered included a long stretch of the Indian Ocean off Java’s southern coast as well as the Sunda Strait that separates the island from Sumatra.
“This is a part of the Indian Ocean that has been never been sampled for deep-sea animals so we really didn’t know what to find,” said Peter Ng, a crab expert and head of the Lee Kong Chian Natural History Museum at NUS.
“We were very surprised by the findings,” he said on Thursday, adding that the team had expected to discover creatures from the Indian Ocean and the surrounding areas already known to scientists.
But the discovery of species entirely new to science “tells us that there are things happening in that part of Indonesia that we don’t know,” said Ng, who co-led the expedition.
The researchers examined 63 sites as they sailed from Jakarta to Cilacap town in southern Java and back.
Three new species of spider crabs were discovered during the expedition, the scientists said in a statement.
One of them had a plate protecting its eyes which resembled oversized ears while another was bright orange in color.
Another discovery was a new species of hermit crab with bright green eyes, according to Indonesian scientist Dwi Listyo Rahayu, also a crab expert and the expedition’s co-leader.
One new species of shrimp had shiny eyes that reflect light, the scientists said.
Ng, the NUS professor, said the scientists will carry out a detailed study of the more than 12,000 creatures from 800 species they had picked up on the expedition and publish their findings in 2020.
They expect to discover more new species as they go along, he said.
The reason they immediately identified the new species of crabs, prawns and lobsters is that the scientists involved are experts in this field, he added.