What does lifting of US sanctions against Sudan mean?

A photo taken on October 2, 2017 shows a fruit seller laying out grapes and organising produce at a shop in the Sudanese capital's twin city of Omdurman. (AFP)
Updated 06 October 2017
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What does lifting of US sanctions against Sudan mean?

KHARTOUM: The United States on Friday brought to an end a raft sanctions imposed against Sudan in 1997 over Khartoum’s alleged support to Islamist militant groups.
What does the lifting of the trade embargo actually mean?
- With the removing of the sanctions, all international banking transactions will be permitted with Sudan, and American individuals and companies can now process transactions involving counterparts in Sudan
- US individuals can engage in imports and exports that were previously prohibited under the sanctions
- US persons can engage in transactions involving property in which the government of Sudan has an interest
- As a result of the lifting of the embargo, all property and interests in property blocked pursuant to the sanctions regulations will be unblocked.
- All trade between the United States and Sudan that was previously prohibited will be authorized.
- All transactions by US persons relating to the petroleum or petrochemical industries in Sudan that were previously prohibited will be authorized, including oilfield services and oil and gas pipelines.
- US individuals will no longer be prohibited from facilitating transactions between Sudan and third countries, to the extent previously prohibited by the embargo.
- The lifting of the embargo does not mean that Sudan will be taken out of US Department of State’s list of state sponsors of terrorism.
- A separate set of sanctions imposed by the United Nations Security Council related to the conflict in Darfur also continues. That embargo primarily prevents the supply of arms and related materials to actors operating in Darfur.


Egypt court confirms 20 death sentences over police killings

Updated 13 min 47 sec ago
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Egypt court confirms 20 death sentences over police killings

  • Egypt’s courts have sentenced hundreds of people to death or lengthy jail terms over the unrest that followed Mursi's overthrow
  • The same court on Monday sentenced 80 people to 25-year prison terms and a further 34 to 15 years each in jail over the Kerdassa incident

CAIRO: An Egyptian court on Monday upheld death sentences for 20 Islamists convicted of killing 13 policemen during violent unrest after the military overthrow of president Muhammad Mursi in 2013.
“The verdict is final and cannot be appealed,” a judicial official said.
On August 14, 2013, a month after Mursi was overthrown by the army, security forces forcibly dispersed two pro-Mursi protest camps in Cairo in an operation that killed more than 700 people.
Hours later, a furious crowd attacked a police station in the Cairo suburb of Kerdassa, where 13 policemen were killed.
Egypt’s courts have sentenced hundreds of people to death or lengthy jail terms over the unrest, including Mursi and several leaders of his Muslim Brotherhood movement.
The same court on Monday sentenced 80 people to 25-year prison terms and a further 34 to 15 years each in jail over the Kerdassa incident. It also acquitted 21 defendants.
Earlier this month an Egyptian court upheld death sentences against 75 people in one of the largest mass trials since the 2011 that toppled longtime president Hosni Mubarak.
Former armed forces chief Abdel Fattah El-Sisi won the presidency in 2014 after leading the ouster of Mursi following mass protests against the Islamist’s rule.
El-Sisi won re-election with 97 percent of the vote in March this year, against a single opponent widely seen as a token challenger.