What does lifting of US sanctions against Sudan mean?

A photo taken on October 2, 2017 shows a fruit seller laying out grapes and organising produce at a shop in the Sudanese capital's twin city of Omdurman. (AFP)
Updated 06 October 2017
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What does lifting of US sanctions against Sudan mean?

KHARTOUM: The United States on Friday brought to an end a raft sanctions imposed against Sudan in 1997 over Khartoum’s alleged support to Islamist militant groups.
What does the lifting of the trade embargo actually mean?
- With the removing of the sanctions, all international banking transactions will be permitted with Sudan, and American individuals and companies can now process transactions involving counterparts in Sudan
- US individuals can engage in imports and exports that were previously prohibited under the sanctions
- US persons can engage in transactions involving property in which the government of Sudan has an interest
- As a result of the lifting of the embargo, all property and interests in property blocked pursuant to the sanctions regulations will be unblocked.
- All trade between the United States and Sudan that was previously prohibited will be authorized.
- All transactions by US persons relating to the petroleum or petrochemical industries in Sudan that were previously prohibited will be authorized, including oilfield services and oil and gas pipelines.
- US individuals will no longer be prohibited from facilitating transactions between Sudan and third countries, to the extent previously prohibited by the embargo.
- The lifting of the embargo does not mean that Sudan will be taken out of US Department of State’s list of state sponsors of terrorism.
- A separate set of sanctions imposed by the United Nations Security Council related to the conflict in Darfur also continues. That embargo primarily prevents the supply of arms and related materials to actors operating in Darfur.


Libyan airstrikes target group attacking oil ports

Smoke and flames rise from an oil storage tank that was set on fire amid fighting between rival factions at Ras Lanuf terminal, Libya. Reuters
Updated 19 June 2018
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Libyan airstrikes target group attacking oil ports

  • The country is now split between rival governments in the east and west, each backed by an array of militias
  • The UN Support Mission in Libya condemned the assault on the ports of Ras Lanuf and Al-Sidr

CAIRO: Libyan forces carried out airstrikes against a militia attacking key oil ports in the east, a spokesman said as Libya’s national oil firm warned on Monday of further damage to oil infrastructure as well as environmental contamination in the north African country.
A militia, led by Ibrahim Jadhran who opposes Libya’s self-styled national army commanded by Field Marshal Khalifa Haftar, attacked the oil ports of Ras Lanuf and Al-Sidr on Thursday forcing the National Oil Corporation to suspend exports and evacuate its employees.
The airstrikes late Sunday targeted fighters loyal to Jadhran, who are trying to seize the oil terminals, said Ahmed Al-Mesmari, a spokesman for the LNA.
He said warplanes carried out airstrikes against “terrorist positions and gatherings in the operational military zone stretching from Ras Lanuf to the edge of the city of Sirte.”
Al-Mesmari called on residents in the oil crescent area to stay away from “areas where the enemy gathers, munition storages and sites with military vehicles.”
Jadhran said in a video circulated on social media on Thursday that he had formed an alliance to retake oil terminals. “Our aim is to overturn the injustice for our people over the past two years,” he said.
The attack by Jadhran’s militia caused “significant” damage to at least two storage tanks, the NOC said Monday in a statement. It warned of further damage to oil infrastructure as well as environmental contamination.
The firm called for an unconditional and immediate withdrawal of Jadhran’s forces, adding that the closure meant the loss of 240,000 barrels per day in oil production. It advised two tankers scheduled to arrive at the ports to remain at sea until the situation was under control.
The UN Support Mission in Libya condemned the assault on the ports of Ras Lanuf and Al-Sidr. “This dangerous escalation in Oil Crescent area puts Libya’s economy in jeopardy and risks igniting a widespread confrontation,” UNSMIL tweeted on Thursday.
Jadhran is a rebel commander who took part in the 2011 uprising that toppled and later killed dictator Moammar Qaddafi. In 2013, he proclaimed himself the guardian of Libya’s oil crescent including the ports of Al-Sidr, Ras Lanuf and Brega, which represent about 60 percent of Libya’s oil resources. His actions cost the oil-rich country billions of dollars.
He lost control of the oil crescent to Haftar’s forces in 2016.
Libya descended into chaos following the 2011 uprising. The country is now split between rival governments in the east and west, each backed by an array of militias. Haftar is allied with the east-based administration that is at odds with the UN-backed government based in the capital, Tripoli.