Allies back May after leader admits plot to oust her

Britain’s Prime Minister Theresa May
Updated 07 October 2017
0

Allies back May after leader admits plot to oust her

LONDON: Senior British Conservatives rallied to the support of embattled Prime Minister Theresa May on Friday, after a lawmaker said he had a list of 30 colleagues who want her to resign.
Grant Shapps, a former party chairman, said “a growing number of people feel it’s time to make a change” after a poor election result and a disastrous conference speech by May earlier this week.
The number of rebels falls short of the 48 lawmakers needed to trigger a formal leadership challenge under party rules, but the plot further rattles May’s shaky grip on power.
May became prime minister through a Conservative leadership contest when David Cameron resigned in the wake of Britain’s June 2016 vote to leave the EU. Since then she has struggled to unite a government that is divided over how the country should leave the EU and what relationship it wants with the bloc after Brexit.
May was further weakened when she called a snap election for June that saw the Conservatives reduced to a minority government. A speech on Wednesday designed to reinvigorate the party descended into disaster as May was interrupted by a prankster and almost silenced by a sore throat, before letters began dropping off the slogan behind her.
In recent weeks Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson has gone public with his own plans for Brexit, a move widely seen as a challenge to May.
Shapps told Sky News that May is “a very decent woman” but without a new leader “we may be in a holding pattern which may be an ever-descending one.”
But senior Cabinet colleagues declared support for May, saying she must stay in office to steer the country through Brexit, due in 2019.
Environment Secretary Michael Gove, a prominent Brexit campaigner, said Friday that May had “shown tremendous grace and grit in the course of this week.”
“I think Theresa’s doing a great job,” he told Sky News.
Other Conservatives took to Twitter to back their leader. Lawmaker Nadhim Zahawi tweeted that he had been “inundated with message(s) of support” for May and Shapps had “misjudged the mood of the party.”
Legislator James Cleverley posted on Twitter that Shapps “is doing himself, the party, and (most importantly) the country no favors at all. Just stop.”


Trump rejects Putin’s proposal to let Russia interrogate US citizens

US President Donald Trump speaks during a cabinet meeting on July 18, 2018, at the White House in Washington, DC. (AFP)
Updated 20 July 2018
0

Trump rejects Putin’s proposal to let Russia interrogate US citizens

  • Mueller is investigating possible collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia
  • Hopefully President Putin will have the 12 identified Russians come to the United States to prove their innocence or guilt

WASHINGTON: President Donald Trump rejected Thursday a proposal by Vladimir Putin to allow Russian officials to interrogate a former US ambassador and other American citizens, amid outrage across Washington that he would even consider it.
While Trump originally called the idea an “incredible offer,” and continued to weigh it through Wednesday, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said he has now decided against it.
“It is a proposal that was made in sincerity by President Putin, but President Trump disagrees with it,” Sanders said.
Putin unveiled the proposal in a joint press conference with Trump on Monday following their summit meeting in Helsinki, Finland.
Asked whether he would extradite 12 Russian intelligence agents indicted in the United States last week for hacking Democratic Party computers, he said he could meet the US government “halfway.”
“We can actually permit official representatives of the United States... into the country and they will be present at this questioning” of the 12 inside Russia.
“Then we would expect that the Americans would reciprocate and they would question officials, including the officers of law enforcement and intelligence services of the United States ... who have something to do with illegal actions on the territory of Russia, and we have to request the presence of our law enforcement.”
For Russia, the focus of the quid-pro-quo was questioning former US envoy to Russia Michael McFaul and 11 others in Moscow’s case against billionaire investor and human rights activist William Browder, the driving force behind Magnitsky Act sanctions on Russian officials passed by the US Congress.
“I think that’s an incredible offer,” Trump responded in Helsinki.

McFaul expressed outrage on Wednesday when Sanders said Trump was “going to meet with his team” to consider Putin’s proposal.
But on Thursday Sanders made clear a deal with Putin was not in the cards.
“Hopefully President Putin will have the 12 identified Russians come to the United States to prove their innocence or guilt,” said Sanders.
“It’s not going to happen,” Secretary of State Mike Pompeo echoed late Thursday.
“There were suggestions, comments, thoughts by President Putin with respect to that inquiry. President Trump was very clear we’re not going to force Americans to go to Russia to be interrogated by the Russians,” he said.
The indictments issued last week by special counsel Robert Mueller allege that the Russian hackers publicly released tens of thousands of stolen Democratic emails and documents using “fictitious online personas.”
Mueller is investigating possible collusion between Trump’s campaign and Russia.
Sanders made the statement just as the US Senate took up a resolution objecting to any move by the Trump administration to make US officials available for questioning by Russian government officials.
In a sharp rebuke to the White House, the resolution passed with unanimous support from both parties, 98-0.
“Let this resolution be a warning to the administration that Congress will not allow this to happen,” said Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer.