Viral YouTube video shows Emirates A380 in terrifying landing at German airport

Emirates is the largest A380 customer with 96 in its fleet, which the Dubai-based carrier has deployed for its 48 destinations including Dusseldorf. (Courtesy Emirates)
Updated 07 October 2017
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Viral YouTube video shows Emirates A380 in terrifying landing at German airport

DUBAI: This is one of those airplane rides that could make even the bravest passengers squirm with fear in their seats.
Plane spotter Martin Bogdan has posted on YouTube a terrifying video showing an Emirates Airbus A380 being caught in huge gusts of wind on final approach at Germany’s Dusseldorf airport after a flight from Dubai.
The world’s biggest passenger aircraft, which can seat more than 500, was seen violently jerking from side to side upon touching down the runway due to high winds caused by storm Xavier, before the pilot managed to bring it under control.
“I have filmed a few thousand crosswind landings at several airports in Europe within the past years, but this Airbus A380 crosswind landing was extremely hard and extraordinary. At first it looked like a pretty normal crosswind approach but after touchdown the pilots tried to align with the runway which looked pretty incredible,” Bogdan said in his comments for the video.

“I have never seen such a tremendous reaction of an airplane after a touchdown. You can see that the pilots tried to align with the runway by using the tail rudder and luckily it worked out.”
Emirates’ Flight EK55 video has gone viral, with 4.24 million views since it was first posted on October 5 in Bogdan’s YouTube channel Cargospotter, and continues to gather views.
“This video shows the incredible skills of the pilots. Even after an unexpected wind gust after touchdown they managed to re-align with the runway. Incredible job by the pilots,” Bogdan said.
An Emirates spokesperson said that Flight EK55 landed safely and at no point “was the safety of the passengers and crew on board compromised.”
Emirates is the largest A380 customer with 96 in its fleet, which the Dubai-based carrier has deployed for its 48 destinations including Dusseldorf. The Dubai carrier will welcome the delivery of its 100th A380 aircraft later this year.


Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

A still from the film.
Updated 19 July 2018
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Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

DENVER: Like a gallery wall-sized enlargement of a microscopic image, “Scenes from a Marriage” is all about size, space and perspective.
Directed by Ingmar Bergman — whose birth centenary was marked this week — at 281 minutes long, its unwieldly length presents an intimidating canvas, yet the claustrophobic intimacy of its gaze is unprecedented: The two leads are alone in nearly every scene, many of which play out for more than a half-hour at a time.
Premiered in 1973, the work is technically a TV mini-series, but such is its legend that theaters continue to program its nearly five-hour arc in its entirety. A three-hour cinematic edit was prepared for US theater consumption a year later (it won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was ruled ineligible for the corresponding Oscar).
Not a lot a happens but, then again, everything does. Shot over four months on a shoestring budget, its six chapters punctuate the period of a decade. The audience are voyeurs, dropped amid the precious and pivotal moments which may not make up a life, but come to define it.
We meet the affluent Swedish couple Marianne and Johan — played by regular screen collaborators Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson, both of whom clocked at least 10 Bergman credits — gloating about ten years’ happy marriage to a visiting reporter. This opening magazine photoshoot is the only time we see their two children on camera, and inevitably the image projected is as glossy, reflective and disposable as the paper it will be printed on.
The pressures, pains and communication breakdowns which tear this unsuited pair apart are sadly familiar. The series was blamed for a spike in European divorce rates. It may be difficult to survive the piece liking either lead, but impossible not to emerge sharing deep pathos with them both. Sadly, much of the script is said to be drawn from Bergman’s real-life off-screen relationship with Ullmann.
It’s a hideously humane, surgical close-up likely to leave even the happiest couple groping into the ether on their way out of the cinema.