16 killed as gunmen attack Mozambique police

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Updated 07 October 2017
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16 killed as gunmen attack Mozambique police

MAPUTO: Suspected militants attacked a string of police stations in a small town in northern Mozambique killing two policemen but 14 of the gunmen were slain, police said on Saturday.
Police have been slow in releasing details of the attacks which occurred on Thursday and Friday in Mocimboa de Praia.
"We recorded 14 deaths and several bandits were wounded," police spokesman Inacio Dina told AFP. Police said the attacks were coordinated.
Local media said three police stations in the sleepy town, 80 km from natural gas fields, were targeted.
At a news conference on Thursday, Dina suggested the attackers were linked to a homegrown radical sect but gave no details.
Police have so far arrested 10 other gunmen, recovered four firearms and more than 100 rounds of ammunition.
"The motive of the attacks is still unknown," Dina said.
"The way they operated makes us believe that there is a structure behind the group," Dina told AFP, but ruled out any links "between the attackers and external forces".
"There is no evidence that they are members of Al-Shabab or Boko Haram. According to the information gathered, all those captured or killed are Mozambicans," said the police spokesman speaking from the capital Maputo.
A local journalist suggested on social media that the attackers belonged to the virtually unknown group, Swalissuna, which has been in existence for about five years.
"They have specific grievances with the police and aimed the attack at them," tweeted journalist and private media owner Erik Charas.
The attacks lasted two days, until the police dispatched special forces from Pemba, 500 km away.
Armed clashes and assassinations of politicians are not uncommon in Mozambique.
On-and-off clashes have occurred in recent years between government troops and armed militias loyal to opposition party and former rebel movement Renamo.
But a truce unilaterally declared by Renamo in December has been observed with only minor breaches.


Bangladesh to relocate 100,000 Rohingya refugees despite HRW warning

Rohingya refugees at a market at the Hakimpara refugee camp on Sunday. (AFP)
Updated 8 min 13 sec ago
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Bangladesh to relocate 100,000 Rohingya refugees despite HRW warning

  • I think the government may consider the relocation of the refugees after the general election: Bangladeshi relief management secretary

DHAKA: The Bangladesh government claims to have completed all necessary preparations to relocate 100,000 Rohingya refugees to the newly formed Bhashan Char (floating island) in the Bay of Bengal.

The government has rendered a deaf ear to concerns raised by climate change experts, human rights activists and the refugee community itself about the idea of relocation to the floating island who call the desolate place “uninhabitable.”

Shah Kamal, disaster and relief management secretary of the Bangladesh government, said the government has completed “90 percent of preparations in this regard.” 

He told Arab News that the Bangladesh navy is assisting in construction units for Rohingya refugees and building a dam to protect the island from high tides and cyclones. 

“Our government has built 120 cyclone centers and 141 sheds to ensure comfortable living for Rohingya. Here, the inhabitants will enjoy proper sanitation and bathroom facilities as well,” Kamal said. 

“Each of the sheds will accommodate 16 families and the refugees here will get the opportunities for livelihood through cattle rearing, vegetable cultivation and other income-generating chores,” he added. 

However, although the preparations are almost over, Kamal could not confirm the exact date when the authorities will start the relocation process. 

“I think the government may consider the relocation of the refugees after the general election which is scheduled to take place on Dec. 30,” he said. 

The US-based Human Rights Watch (HRW) has strongly opposed the relocation idea. In its recent 68-page report, the HRW warned that the floating island is still “uninhabitable” and “formed only in the last 20 years by silt from Bangladesh’s Meghna River.” 

The island can be “completely submerged during an event of high tide” which will endanger the lives of the people on the island, the report said.

Security concerns

According to HRW, the island is completely separated from the mainland by about 30 kilometers, which would “essentially turn the island into a detention center.” 

Responding to the HRW report, Kamal said: “We have taken all safety measures and addressed all the relevant security concerns.” 

The Rohingya refugees who are proposed for relocation to the island have also strongly rejected the idea.

Abdul Awal, 35, a refugee living in Kutupalang camp, told Arab News: “This relocation to the island will restrict all our movement and eventually it will be a sort of isolation from the mainland. I don’t think any of my fellow refugees will comply with this idea.”

Mohammad Akkas, 42, another refugee of the Jamtoli camp, said: “I have heard about the relocation. However, it’s not clear to me what will happen during the devastating cyclones and medical emergencies. Is it practical to travel 30 kilometers through the rough sea during any emergency situation?“

Climate experts and human rights activists in the country also echoed the voice of the HRW, which opposed the idea of relocation now. 

Dr. Shahidul Islam, a renowned climate change expert from Bangladesh, termed the island as “the most vulnerable place for human beings.”

 “This area is highly prone to high tide and cyclone. During any high tide, the island may be completely submerged under water,” said Islam, a professor at Dhaka University.

 He believes that this relocation will cause “serious ecological” repercussions and create “ocean pollution” in the Bay of Bengal.

 “It may also increase the risk of international human trafficking since the area is isolated from the mainland and accessible to the traffickers through water,” Islam said.

“Already, in Cox’s Bazar, huge environmental damage has been caused by the Rohingyas. Now, if they are relocated to the newly built Bhashan Char, it will also create irreparable loss to the ecology and environment of the island,” Islam said. 

Nur Khan, an eminent human rights activist, said the relocation would “isolate the refugees from the mainland and will make them vulnerable to natural disasters.” 

“However, if it is inevitable that the refugees will be relocated to the island, the government can make it free for all the concerned stakeholders so they all can experience the reality on ground and make suggestions on the relocation idea,” Khan pointed out.

“Considering the present circumstances, I can’t support the refugees’ relocation at this moment,” especially since the HRW has also identified six other feasible relocation sites in its report, said Khan.