Iraq conflict photos, reportages dominate Bayeux awards

Iraqi photographer Ali Arkady receives the Photo Prize award during the closing ceremony of the 2017 Bayeux-Calvados Awards for war correspondents in Bayeux, northwestern France, on Saturday. (AFP)
Updated 08 October 2017
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Iraq conflict photos, reportages dominate Bayeux awards

BAYEUX, France: A grim series of photographs titled “Kissing Death” by Iraq’s Ali Arkady on the bloody conflict in his country won the prestigious Bayeux-Calvados photo awards for war correspondents on Saturday.
The brutal pictures tracked Iraqi special forces in battles in Tikrit, Fallujah and Mosul and included horrendous images of torture and violence. They were published by the VII photo agency.
“They are the most sinister, upsetting pictures I have seen in my entire life,” veteran war correspondent Jeremy Bowen, the head of the jury, told AFP.
“The pictures were really, really strong, they were evil,” he said.
“You could see evil... I could feel it in my stomach, the dark side of the world,” said Bowen, a BBC journalist whose career spans three decades.
However, photographer Arkady’s reporting had triggered a debate among the 50 journalists on the prize jury.
The 34-year-old had followed a division of Iraqi soldiers to denouce their acts of torture but he admitted to having participated twice in these “war crimes” out of fear of reprisals.
“In the end the service he did by taking those pictures is more powerful than the fact he made some mistakes,” Bowen said.
Arkady confirmed to AFP that he did participate in two acts of torture, of which he has said in other interviews he was “not proud.”
When accepting his award at Bayeux the photographer said he wanted “the Iraqi government to realize that these soldiers committed war crimes. I want to stop that, but unfortunately, it continues.”
For reportage, the French journalist Samuel Forey won a prize for tracking five days in the battle for Mosul, Iraq’s second city, which was recaptured from the Daesh terrorists in July.
His accounts were published in France’s Le Figaro newspaper.
Radio journalist Gwendoline Debono from Europe 1 was honored for her work on the entry of Iraqi troops into Mosul.
In television, a 26-year-old woman called Waad Al-Kateab commissioned by Britain’s Channel 4 to make a film about life inside the Syrian city of Aleppo, won a prize for her work on the last hospital held by rebels.
Olivier Sarbil also won a TV prize for his film about the battle for Mosul, which was aired by Channel 4.
About 330 works had been entered for the prizes, of which some 50 were short-listed. The prize money ranges from 3,000 to 5,000 euros.


UK’s Prince Philip ‘shocked and shaken’ after car crash

Updated 9 min 22 sec ago
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UK’s Prince Philip ‘shocked and shaken’ after car crash

  • Prince Philip’s vehicle turned on its side after pulling out of a Sandringham driveway onto a main road and colliding with the Kia
  • Philip, known for his forthright manner and off-color jokes, formally retired from public life in 2017

LONDON: Queen Elizabeth II’s 97-year-old husband Prince Philip was “very shocked and shaken” after being involved in a car accident that left his Land Rover flipped on its side, a witness reportedly said.
The duke emerged unharmed but two people in another car were injured in the crash that occurred Thursday when the duke was driving near the Sandringham Estate, according to police and Buckingham Palace.
Norfolk Police said two women — the driver and passenger of a Kia — required hospital treatment but were later discharged. It would not confirm reports that a baby was also in the car.
The BBC reported that Prince Philip’s vehicle turned on its side after pulling out of a Sandringham driveway onto a main road and colliding with the Kia.
Witness Roy Warne, 75, told The Sun newspaper that the Prince was pulled from the wreckage “conscious” but “very shocked and shaken.”
“I saw the car flip,” he said, adding that he rushed to help free the driver before he “suddenly realized it was Prince Philip.”
An image from the accident scene published by a local radio station showed two cars by the side of the road, one on its side with a smashed windscreen and another a few yards away in bushes.
“The Duke of Edinburgh was involved in a road traffic accident with another vehicle this afternoon,” the palace said in a statement.
“The Duke was not injured. The accident took place close to the Sandringham Estate. Local police attended the scene.”
She added that the duke saw a doctor “as a precaution” who confirmed he was not hurt.
Norfolk Police said, in accordance with policy in collisions, it breathalyzed both drivers.
“We can confirm both drivers were breath tested and provided negative readings,” the force added.
It said officers were called to the estate shortly before 3:00 p.m. (1500 GMT) “after a Land Rover and Kia were involved in a collision.”
“The male driver of the Land Rover was uninjured,” it added.
“The female driver of the Kia suffered cuts while the female passenger sustained an arm injury, both requiring hospital treatment.”
The Press Association reported that there was a passenger in the duke’s vehicle who was likely his close protection officer
The royal couple spends most of the winter at the residence in Norfolk, an English county northeast of London, which continues to operate as a sporting estate.
Philip, known for his forthright manner and off-color jokes, formally retired from public life in 2017.
He has been seen behind the wheel on numerous occasions over the decade, including with world leaders and dignitaries as his passengers.
In 2016, alongside the Queen he drove former US President Barack Obama and his wife Michelle around Windsor Castle in a Range Rover after they landed nearby in the presidential helicopter.
Meanwhile the duke continued to compete in demanding carriage-driving competitions into his 80s, and has previously pulled muscles in his back while driving his horse-drawn carriage.
Philip described in an interview how he took up carriage driving when he gave up polo aged 50, helping to establish it as a sport in subsequent years.
Born a prince of Greece and Denmark, he married then princess Elizabeth on November 20, 1947 at Westminster Abbey in London.
On their golden wedding anniversary in 1997, she said of him: “He has, quite simply, been my strength and stay all these years.”