US Supreme Court won’t take up Guantanamo detainee case

In this June 27, 2006 file photo, reviewed by a U.S. Department of Defense official, U.S. military guards walk within Camp Delta military-run prison, at the Guantanamo Bay U.S. Naval Base, Cuba. (AP)
Updated 11 October 2017
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US Supreme Court won’t take up Guantanamo detainee case

WASHINGTON: The US Supreme Court on Tuesday refused an appeal bid by one of Guantanamo’s most famous detainees, backing the legitimacy of the special military courts in place at the US naval base in Cuba.
The decision confirms the life sentence handed to Ali Hamza Ahmad Al-Bahlul, a lieutenant of Osama bin Laden, and held in Guantanamo since 2002.
The Yemeni, identified as the former propagandist of Al-Qaeda, appealed his conviction in 2008 for criminal conspiracy.
According to his lawyers, this charge should have been brought before a federal civil court and not a military court.
The Supreme Court move is good news to Donald Trump’s administration. He has spoken in favor of resorting more to using Guantanamo facilities and courts.
A number of men suspected of involvement in the September 11, 2001 attacks are still awaiting trial on the US base.
In an important decision called “Boumediene vs Bush,” the US Supreme Court in 2008 allowed Guantanamo detainees to challenge the validity of their detention before American civil courts.
But the Supreme Court has since refrained from widening the scope for questioning the actions of the Guantanamo court.


At least 12 dead in Mali attack near Nigeria

Updated 27 min 17 sec ago
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At least 12 dead in Mali attack near Nigeria

  • About 200 people, many of them civilians from the Fulani and Tuareg tribes have been killed in the area this year by militants
  • Mali’s unrest stems from a 2012 Tuareg separatist uprising which was exploited by extremists

BAMAKO, Mali: At least 12 Tuareg civilians died Tuesday in an attack by gunmen in eastern Mali, a region hit by chronic unrest between local tribes and militants, sources said.
About 200 people, many of them civilians from the Fulani and Tuareg tribes have been killed in the area this year as militants claiming allegiance to Daesh clash with local groups backing a French security force and the Malian army.
The attack took place 45 kilometers (28 miles) west of Menaka according to a local official, a security source, and a statement by ex-rebels in the Movement for the Salvation of Azawad (MSA).
“Armed men on motorcycles killed at least 12 civilians,” the official told AFP, citing a resident of the town who claimed to have seen the bodies.
The official, who asked to remain anonymous, added that “for now we do not know exactly who did it. I don’t know if it was the result of a dispute between tribes or a terrorist act.”
The security source said some of his sources spoke of 12 dead, while others put the toll at 16.
The MSA statement said “armed individuals on motorcycles had executed 17 civilians” from two Tuareg camps.
Mali’s unrest stems from a 2012 Tuareg separatist uprising which was exploited by extremists in order to take over key cities in the north.
The extremists were largely driven out in a French-led military operation launched in January 2013.