Saudi lab teams up with UL to target renewables

Updated 12 October 2017

Saudi lab teams up with UL to target renewables

LONDON: US-based safety analysis firm UL has joined forces with Saudi Arabia's GCC Lab to boost the region’s renewable energy market.
The joint venture will pool resources and update certification requirements as the firms expand further into the green energy sector.
The venture will focus on services related to renewables — such as pre-commissioning tests, construction monitoring services and product testing of solar PV modules, including accessories that comply with benchmark standards.
Historically, private company UL — which has operations around the world — has drafted safety standards for electrical devices and components.
UL’s regional base operates out of offices in Dubai and its new state-of-the-art lab facility in Abu Dhabi. The joint venture will operate as a UL and GCC Lab Company and will be based in Dammam, to cater to customers throughout the Middle East, including Egypt.
A joint announcement said the partnership would capitalize on UL’s reputation as the leading safety science company in the region and on the GCC’s strength and mandate as part of the Kingdom’s Vision 2030 to diversify its economy.
Hamid Syed, vice president and GM, UL Middle East, said: “We are delighted to be able to be part of aggressive renewable targets by offering a complete range of services via the new joint venture company and excited about developing new relationships through the extended client base.”


Huawei given 90 days to buy from US suppliers

Trader Tommy Kalikas works on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, Monday, Aug. 19, 2019. (AP)
Updated 20 August 2019

Huawei given 90 days to buy from US suppliers

  • Shortly after blacklisting the company in May, the Commerce Department initially allowed Huawei to purchase some American-made goods in a move aimed at minimizing disruption for its customers

WASHINGTON: US Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross said Monday the US government will extend a reprieve given to Huawei Technologies that permits the Chinese firm to buy supplies from US companies so that it can service existing customers, even as nearly 50 of its units were being added to a US economic blacklist.
The “temporary general license,” due to expire on Monday, will be extended for Huawei for 90 days, he told Fox Business Network Monday, confirming an expected decision first reported Friday by Reuters. He also said he was adding 46 Huawei affiliates to the Entity List, raising the total number to more than 100 Huawei entities that are covered by the restrictions.
Ross said the extension was to aid US customers, many of which operate networks in rural America.
“We’re giving them a little more time to wean themselves off,” Ross said.
Shortly after blacklisting the company in May, the Commerce Department initially allowed Huawei to purchase some American-made goods in a move aimed at minimizing disruption for its customers.
The extension, through Nov. 19, renews an agreement continuing the Chinese company’s ability to maintain existing telecommunications networks and provide software updates to Huawei handsets.
Asked what will happen in November to US companies, Ross said: “Everybody has had plenty of notice of it, there have been plenty of discussions with the president.”
When the Commerce Department blocked Huawei from buying US goods earlier this year, it was seen as a major escalation in the Sino-US trade war.
The US government blacklisted Huawei, alleging the Chinese company is involved in activities contrary to national security or foreign policy interests.

BACKGROUND

The US blacklisted Huawei, alleging the Chinese company was involved in activities contrary to national security or foreign policy interests.

As an example, the blacklisting order cited a pending federal criminal case concerning allegations Huawei violated US sanctions against Iran. Huawei has pleaded not guilty in the case.

The order noted that the indictment also accused Huawei of “deceptive and obstructive acts.”
At the same time the US says Huawei’s smartphones and network equipment could be used by China to spy on Americans, allegations the company has repeatedly denied.
Huawei, the world’s largest telecommunications equipment maker, is still prohibited from buying American parts and components to manufacture new products without additional special licenses.
Many Huawei suppliers have requested the special licenses to sell to the firm. Ross told reporters late last month he had received more than 50 applications, and that he expected to receive more. He said on Monday that there were no “specific licenses being granted for anything.”