Indian rangers hunt ‘man-eating’ tiger

India is home to more than half of the world's tiger population. (AFP)
Updated 13 October 2017
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Indian rangers hunt ‘man-eating’ tiger

MUMBAI: Armed park rangers are desperately trying to kill or capture a “man-eating” tiger blamed for killing four people in central India, a forestry official said.
The two-year-old female tiger was initially captured in July after killing two villagers and injuring four others in Brahmapuri in Maharashtra state.
It was later released into the nearby Bor Wildlife Sanctuary but went on to attack and kill another two people. Its latest victim, a woman, died earlier this week.
Rishikesh Ranjan, field director of Pench Tiger Reserve, close to Bor, said that a local court had approved a shoot-to-kill order against the tigress, named “Kala.”
“She has killed four people and injured four others. We can shoot her but we would prefer to capture and tranquillize her,” he said late Thursday.
Ranjan said officials were tracking the tiger using GPS and wanted to catch her as soon as possible because she is “spreading panic among villagers.”
“In her last killing she consumed a major chunk of the victim’s body,” he said.
Tigers do not generally attack humans, but some experts believe they can get a taste for human flesh once they have attacked once.
India is home to more than half of the world’s tiger population with some 2,226 of the animals roaming its reserves, according to the last count in 2014.
Dozens die every year, sometimes at the hands of poachers, while reports of man-animal conflict are not uncommon. Wildlife activists say they occur when humans encroach into tiger corridors.
In October last year armed forest guards shot dead a man-eating tiger in northern India.
It was blamed for killing three villagers, including a woman outside Jim Corbett National Park in Uttarakhand state.
Villagers celebrated by parading with the dead animal’s carcass for nearly three hours.


‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ blurs the line between good and bad

A still from the kid-friendly film. (Sony Pictures Animation)
Updated 23 July 2018
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‘Hotel Transylvania 3’ blurs the line between good and bad

  • The characters are sharply etched out, with pointed features and wonderful detail

CHENNAI: Nothing can be compared to Japanese animation, especially the works of cinematic art created by Hayao Miyazaki (“Spirited Away,” “Princess Mononoke,” “The Wind Rises”), which is not just sharply political but also intensely emotional. In comparison, American animated films may seem somewhat plastic, though the Hotel Transylvania franchise has risen above the mundane. The latest installment,” Hotel Transylvania 3: A Monster Vacation,” from director Genndy Tartakovsky, depicts a battle between good and evil.
The plot sees Dracula (voiced by Adam Sandler), his daughter Mavis (Selena Gomez), her human husband Johnny (Andy Samberg) and the entire monster entourage go on a cruise vacation to Atlantis. On board, widowed and lonely Dracula falls head over heels in love with the director of the event, Ericka (Kathryn Hahn). However — plot twist! — she is a human being and several centuries younger. Even worse, she is the granddaughter of the legendary vampire hunter Abraham Van Helsing (Jim Gaffigan), whose bitter enmity with Dracula dates back to the 1800s. It is liberally interspersed with humor, which comes courtesy of the Mummy, the Invisible Man and the giant puppy that Dracula's grandson smuggles aboard the ship.
Tartakovsky, who helmed all three editions of the franchise, undoubtedly employed a brilliant set of animators — the characters are sharply etched out, with pointed features and wonderful detail. The wit flows at a breathless pace, but what is lacking is a certain novelty, which one expects in an ongoing series.
One plus point is that parents will not find themselves wanting for entertainment. Dracula's romance with Ericka may be lost on children, but it will keep the adults entertained. At 97 minutes long, however, the film could have been far more fantastic.