UAE to deport jailed expats for sex outside of wedlock

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Updated 13 October 2017
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UAE to deport jailed expats for sex outside of wedlock

DUBAI: An Egyptian woman has been jailed by Dubai courts for a month after she fell pregnant outside of wedlock.
The woman, who will be deported once she has served her sentence, had been in a relationship with a Palestinian man until he broke it off when she fell pregnant in 2016 according to local press reports.
She was staying with a male friend when she went into labor. The man took her to hospital, but the baby was stillborn.

Hospital staff called police when the woman failed to produce a marriage certificate following the birth to prove the father’s identity.

It is illegal in the UAE to have sex out of wedlock and unmarried women who have a baby in the country are immediately reported to the police – although the woman did claim she and the Palestinian were married according to customs in her country.

The woman pleaded guilty to having consensual sex outside of marriage, but the Palestinian denied the charges and instead claimed the baby must have been that of the woman’s male friend who she had been staying with.
The flat mate told the cold that Egyptian woman’s lover regularly visited her and stayed over in her room.
The two defendants appealed the one month jail terms and deportations, but the Dubai Appeal Court upheld the sentences.
The male defendant challenged the second ruling, seeking an acquittal at the Dubai Cassation Court.
His lawyer told the court that legal procedures had not been carried out correctly. He claimed he had not had intercourse with the woman and that her allegations were a rouse to protect her flat mate who she had really fallen pregnant with.
The lawyer told the court that a DNA test should have been conducted in order to back up their claims.


Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

A still from the film.
Updated 19 July 2018
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Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

DENVER: Like a gallery wall-sized enlargement of a microscopic image, “Scenes from a Marriage” is all about size, space and perspective.
Directed by Ingmar Bergman — whose birth centenary was marked this week — at 281 minutes long, its unwieldly length presents an intimidating canvas, yet the claustrophobic intimacy of its gaze is unprecedented: The two leads are alone in nearly every scene, many of which play out for more than a half-hour at a time.
Premiered in 1973, the work is technically a TV mini-series, but such is its legend that theaters continue to program its nearly five-hour arc in its entirety. A three-hour cinematic edit was prepared for US theater consumption a year later (it won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was ruled ineligible for the corresponding Oscar).
Not a lot a happens but, then again, everything does. Shot over four months on a shoestring budget, its six chapters punctuate the period of a decade. The audience are voyeurs, dropped amid the precious and pivotal moments which may not make up a life, but come to define it.
We meet the affluent Swedish couple Marianne and Johan — played by regular screen collaborators Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson, both of whom clocked at least 10 Bergman credits — gloating about ten years’ happy marriage to a visiting reporter. This opening magazine photoshoot is the only time we see their two children on camera, and inevitably the image projected is as glossy, reflective and disposable as the paper it will be printed on.
The pressures, pains and communication breakdowns which tear this unsuited pair apart are sadly familiar. The series was blamed for a spike in European divorce rates. It may be difficult to survive the piece liking either lead, but impossible not to emerge sharing deep pathos with them both. Sadly, much of the script is said to be drawn from Bergman’s real-life off-screen relationship with Ullmann.
It’s a hideously humane, surgical close-up likely to leave even the happiest couple groping into the ether on their way out of the cinema.