KSA hopes Fatah-Hamas reconciliation will help Palestinians gain legitimate rights

People release pigeons during an event to show support for a unity deal between rival Palestinian factions Hamas and Fatah in Gaza City on October 13, 2017. (REUTERS/Mohammed Salem)
Updated 14 October 2017
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KSA hopes Fatah-Hamas reconciliation will help Palestinians gain legitimate rights

JEDDAH: Saudi Arabia on Friday expressed hopes that the reconciliation of rival Palestinian factions Fatah and Hamas will help them gain their legitimate rights.
A statement carried by the Saudi Press Agency (SPA), citing a sources at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, said it is the kingdom's "hope that this important achievement would achieve the hopes and aspirations of the brotherly Palestinian people to end the division and achieve Palestinian unity, thereby enabling Palestinian brothers to achieve their legitimate rights in accordance with the resolutions of international legitimacy and the Arab peace initiative."
The two Palestinian factions signed a reconciliation agreement on Thursday in Cairo after Hamas agreed to hand over administrative control of Gaza, including the key Rafah border crossing, a decade after seizing the enclave in a civil war.
Also on Thursday, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres congratulated Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas on the national reconciliation agreement.
In a telephone call, he expressed optimism on the latest progress allowing the Palestinian government to shoulder its responsibilities in Gaza, welcoming Egypt's efforts to reach this goal and calling for solving the humanitarian crisis in Gaza, particularly the power cut and traffic jam.
Guterres reiterated his organization's readiness to continue with the Palestinian authority and the countries of the region their support for the government in Gaza, SPA said.


Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

Updated 25 May 2018
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Mosque of Bones: Evidence of Prophet Muhammad’s era

JEDDAH: Masjid Al-Izam (Mosque of the Bones) is a historic mosque in Al-Ula governorate, located 300 km north of Madinah.
In the ninth year after Hijrah (the emigration of Makkah’s Muslims to Madinah), as the Prophet Muhammad was on his way to battle, he marked the Qibla (the direction in which Muslims should pray) using bones because he could not find rocks or blocks.
To mark the occasion, the area’s residents built a mosque on that spot and named it Masjid Al-Izam.
It was made of stone, and mud was used to cover its walls, but it has undergone several restorations.
“Mention of the mosque can be found in many renowned scientific sources,” Abdullah Kaber, a researcher in Madinah’s development authority, told the Saudi Press Agency (SPA).
He said Masjid Al-Izam has attracted the attention of King Salman, who is focused on restoring a number of historic mosques across the Kingdom.
The Saudi Commission for Tourism and National Heritage (SCTH) is planning to develop tourism in Al-Ula since it houses many historical sites and relics.