Designer causes anger by dressing models in Syrian regime uniforms

Syrian fashion designer Manal Ajaj poses on the catwalk with models wearing army uniforms of the Syrian regime at the end of her fashion show in Beirut. (AFP)
Updated 14 October 2017
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Designer causes anger by dressing models in Syrian regime uniforms

BEIRUT: Syrian fashion designer Manal Ajaj shocked her audience at a show she presented on Wednesday by dressing young Lebanese male models in army uniforms of the Syrian regime.
Lebanon, which hosts 1 million Syrian refugees, has tried to stay neutral in the Syrian conflict.
And it was only 12 years ago that the Syrian Army ended its three-decade presence in Lebanon after the assassination of former Prime Minister Rafiq Al-Hariri.
The audience included Ajaj’s friends, Lebanese and foreign celebrities, and media figures. “This is the second show for Ajaj in Beirut,” Johnny Fadlallah, whose company L.I.P.S. Management organized the event, told Arab News.
“I didn’t understand what happened at the end of the show. I was engaged with preparations at the backstage. I heard some criticism and some praise for the show, and most critical people were from the media. They asked me why Ajaj was a fanatic supporter of the Syrian regime,” he said, adding that her show last year focused on Syrian suffering under Daesh.
“I don’t understand politics. I simply support the party of beauty and fashion. I know Ajaj is a supporter of the Syrian regime. She lives in the UAE, but she has a workshop in Damascus.”
Lebanese fashion journalist Hadia Sinno told Arab News: “I was surprised, like many others, about what happened at the end of the show, when young men came on the catwalk wearing Syrian Army uniforms.”


ISESCO condemns Houthi looting of artifacts from Zabid

Updated 21 January 2019
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ISESCO condemns Houthi looting of artifacts from Zabid

ISESCO condemns Houthi looting of artifacts from Zabid

DUBAI: The Islamic Education, Scientific and Cultural Organization condemned Sunday the Houthis’ theft of manuscripts, historical and scientific books and artifacts from the library of a fortress in Zabid, the Saudi Press Agency said.

Zabid is one of the oldest towns in Yemen, located in Hodeidah province, and has been a UNESCO World Heritage Site since 1993.

The stolen items were valuable artifacts of Zabid, which was the capital of Yemen during the 13th and 15th centuries, and the theft of such heritage was a criminal act against the Yemeni civilizations and a violation of international declarations and agreements, ISESCO director general Abdulaziz bin Othaman Al-Twajairi said.