Emirates launches $15 million “Don’t stop me now” ad campaign

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The one-minute ad spot, shot by award-winning director Vaughan Arnell, utilizes clever camera work that seamlessly transitions between key destinations and Emirates’ onboard features. (Courtesy Emirates YouTube)
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The one-minute ad spot, shot by award-winning director Vaughan Arnell, utilizes clever camera work that seamlessly transitions between key destinations and Emirates’ onboard features. (Courtesy Emirates YouTube)
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The one-minute ad spot, shot by award-winning director Vaughan Arnell, utilizes clever camera work that seamlessly transitions between key destinations and Emirates’ onboard features. (Courtesy Emirates YouTube)
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The one-minute ad spot, shot by award-winning director Vaughan Arnell, utilizes clever camera work that seamlessly transitions between key destinations and Emirates’ onboard features. (Courtesy Emirates YouTube)
Updated 15 October 2017
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Emirates launches $15 million “Don’t stop me now” ad campaign

DUBAI: Emirates on Sunday launched a $15 million rock-inspired advertising campaign to promote airline’s extensive network of global destinations including its home and hub, Dubai.
The carrier’s latest campaign is backed by the legendary British rock band Queen’s soundtrack “Don’t stop me now”, which was found in a scientific study to be the “feel-good” tune on the UK charts in the past 50 years.
The ad, shot by award-winning director Vaughan Arnell, utilizes clever camera work that seamlessly transitions between key destinations and Emirates’ onboard features, reminiscent of a visual storytelling style that show “a picture within a picture”.
The one-minute spot culminates in Dubai, with a soundbite on how Emirates connects the world via Dubai. The campaign will run in key markets around the world starting from 15 October.
“Emirates and Dubai have always been inextricably linked. Each day, Emirates operates more than 500 flights that connect Dubai to the world, and the world through Dubai,” Boutros Boutros, Emirates’ Divisional Senior Vice President for Corporate Communications, Marketing and Brand, said in statement.
“Since day one, Emirates has proudly and actively promoted our hub. Dubai offers a great experience at our world-class airport, and the city has become a top global destination because it continually invests to bring new attractions and supporting infrastructure for international visitors.”
The Dubai carrier has previously tapped US actress Jennifer Aniston in its previous campaigns, particularly for its Airbus A380 service.
Emirates’ strategy to get the former Friends star as brand ambassador was emulated by next-door neighbor Etihad Airways, who brought on board Oscar-winner Nicole Kidman for the Abu Dhabi carrier’s campaign featuring a 360-degree virtual reality film titled Reimagine.
Turkish Airlines also launched a commercial featuring Hollywood heavyweight Morgan Freeman in February during the 51st Super Bowl, which was the most-watched show in US TV history.


For Iranians, economic crisis looms larger than US tensions

Updated 23 min 57 sec ago
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For Iranians, economic crisis looms larger than US tensions

  • Iran’s 80 million people struggle to buy meat, medicine and other staples of daily life
  • Many pointed to the economy, not the possible outbreak of war

TEHRAN: Across Iran’s capital, the talk always seems to come back to how things may get worse.
Battered by US sanctions and its depreciating rial currency, Iran’s 80 million people struggle to buy meat, medicine and other staples of daily life.
Many pointed to the economy, not the possible outbreak of war, as Iran’s major concern. Iran’s rial currency traded at 32,000 to $1 at the time of the 2015 nuclear deal. Now it is at 148,000, and many have seen their life’s savings wiped out.
Nationwide, the unemployment rate is 12 percent. For youth it’s even worse, with a quarter of all young people unemployed, according to Iran’s statistic center.
“The economic situation is very bad, very bad. Unemployment is very high, and those who had jobs have lost theirs,” said Sadeghi, the housewife. “Young people can’t find good jobs, or get married, or become independent.”
Sores Maleki, a 62-year-old retired accountant, said talks with the US to loosen sanctions would help jumpstart Iran’s economy.
“We should go and talk to America with courage and strength. We are able to do that, others have done it,” Maleki said. “We can make concessions and win concessions. We have no other choice.”
But such negotiations will be difficult, said Reza Forghani, a 51-year-old civil servant. He said Iran needed to get the US to “sign a very firm contract that they can’t escape and have to honor.” Otherwise, Iran should drop out of the nuclear deal.
“When someone refuses to keep promises and commitments, you can tolerate it a couple of times, but then certainly you can’t remain committed forever. You will react,” Forghani said. “So I don’t think we should remain committed to the deal until the end.”
Yet for Iran’s youth, many of whom celebrated the signing of the 2015 nuclear deal in the streets, the situation now feels more akin to a funeral. Many openly discuss their options to obtain a visa — any visa — to get abroad.
“Young people have a lot of stress and the future is unknown,” said Hamedzadeh, the 20-year-old civil servant. “The future is so unknown that you can’t plan. The only thing they can do is to somehow leave Iran and build a life abroad.”