Landmark logistics to test Saudi online battle between Amazon and noon

Retailers in Saudi Arabia face a new online challenge with the arrival of noon.com, the regional rival to Amazon. (Reuters)
Updated 18 October 2017
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Landmark logistics to test Saudi online battle between Amazon and noon

RIYADH: In a country where postal codes are rarely used, most people pay in cash, and shopping is done in giant air-conditioned malls, building an online retail business is no easy task.
But two powerfully-backed companies are trying to do just that, betting a young, tech-savvy population will eventually deliver up a large slice of the Arab world’s largest consumer market.
After months of delays, Noon.com launched in the UAE on Oct. 1 and said it would enter the Saudi market “within the coming weeks.”
That will start a race for dominance in a largely untapped market against Dubai-based Souq.com, which is already present in Saudi Arabia and poised for expansion after its acquisition this year by Amazon.
Both companies are well armed for the fight.
Investors in Noon.com, including Dubai billionaire Mohamed Alabbar and Saudi Arabia’s sovereign wealth fund, have put $1 billion into the project. The business also plans to leverage existing assets from Alabbar’s Emaar Malls, Aramex delivery service and Namshi and JadoPado online marketplaces.
Souq.com was known as the “Amazon of the Middle East” even before its purchase by the world’s biggest online retailer, having built up a following and brand relationships since its launch in 2005.
“Amazon and Souq.com will benefit from early-mover advantage in our view,” said Josh Holmes, a consumer analyst at market researcher BMI.
But with online sales in Saudi Arabia expected to surge to $13.9 billion by 2021 from a projected $8.7 billion this year, he said there would be plenty for Noon.com to play for.
“While the rivalry between Amazon/Souq and Noon.com will be intense, we believe there is more than enough room for both players to thrive in Saudi Arabia and the wider region,” Holmes said.
Shifting retail online would be a sea change for commerce in the Middle East, where Internet sales now represent less than two percent of total retail, twelve times less than in the UK, according to a Boston Consulting Group report.
In Saudi Arabia, which has lagged behind regional leader the UAE, it is only 0.8 percent of the total, and both Noon.com and Souq.com will have to adapt to the particular challenges of the market to prosper.
One is getting deliveries right. Currently, delivery companies in Saudi Arabia regularly ask for landmarks rather than addresses, with drivers often requesting WhatsApped locations.
Then there is payment. With less than half the population owning credit cards, e-commerce businesses often have to offer cash on delivery options, increasing their risks.
There are other dangers too. High unemployment among the kingdom’s millennials could cap spending power in the long term.
Yet analysts point to the young population, high rate of technology adoption and high-quality transport networks as reasons for optimism. Some companies are already thriving.
E-commerce now represents more than 40 percent of logistics provider DHL’s inbound parcel business into Saudi Arabia, said country general manager Faysal ElHajjami, forecasting this would continue to grow.
Start-ups are also developing ways to accommodate the kingdom’s last-mile delivery quirks.
Dubai-based Fetchr, for example, operates an app that allows users to identify their location by using GPS, like Uber.
“We realized nobody in Saudi really has a formal address, but everybody has a smart phone attached to their hip,” said co-founder Joy Ajlouny, speaking with partner Idriss Al Rifai.
Over the last year, Fetchr has grown its presence in the kingdom from three to 84 cities, with plans to tackle another 25 by the end of the year, and now employs about 1,000 people.
Ajlouny and Rifai estimate market growth of 20 to 30 percent per year over the next five years, but caution that a five percent value added tax, planned for introduction next year across the Gulf, could check that forecast.
As planned, the tax would be applied each time a product crosses a border, they said, which could be a 15 percent total by the time a customer receives the parcel and 20 percent if he or she decided to return it.
“It would be a huge hindrance,” said Ajlouny. “Everybody is talking about the growth of e-commerce, but this would completely cripple that growth.”


EIBank chief on how to handle geopolitical headwinds

Updated 19 August 2018
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EIBank chief on how to handle geopolitical headwinds

  • Sifri says Gulf region has lots of positive attributes to serve the internationally wealthy community, more so now with Saudi Arabia opening up to foreign investment
  • "Saudi Arabia is going through a significant transition which happens to coincide with a sudden change in the ruling conditions"

DUBAI: Khaled Sifri, chief executive of Emirates Investment Bank, uses two words much of the time: Headwinds, and geopolitics. It turns out they are virtually synonymous for him.

Sifri is in a good place to judge the financial scene in the UAE and the region. The bank, one of the oldest financial institutions in the Emirates, provides investment banking and wealth management expertise for some of the top business families and institutions in the Gulf.

Just recently, he announced a big jump in half-year profits, but was at pains to point to the “headwinds” the bank was continuing to battle in the regional and global economic environments. 

“The region has lots of positive attributes to serve the internationally wealthy community. Sooner or later it will be recognized as a wealth management hub, especially Dubai, and they will see the opportunities of investing in and from the region. All the more so now that Saudi Arabia has opened up to foreign investment,” he said.

Sifri reeled off the positives in the region’s investment architecture: Its location between the big wealth management centers of Singapore and Switzerland; its low tax regime; its more understanding regulatory regime compared with the West.

But then come the headwinds and geopolitics. “All these are the positives, but the geopolitics of the region often make it harder for the wealthy to view it as an alternative,” he said.

“The whole world is going through a big transition. The information revolution, the global financial crisis, even back as far as the demise of the Soviet Union. Trump, Brexit — is that not enough headwind? I have a negative view of Trump’s rhetoric,” he added.

Nonetheless, Sifri believes the region can overcome these challenges because of the unique advantages it enjoys.

Illustration by Luis Grañena

“The wealthy are concerned about tax, so they want to open for low tax jurisdictions like Dubai. That’s why many of them decide to become residents. Also many of them are aware of the heavy regulatory structure in Western markets, and that scares them away, too.

“There are tough rules in the West, and investors end up spending a lot of time and money on lawyers, regulators and compliance people. It is diverting business away from those places. London and New York, too, are being so difficult with compliance that they are throwing the baby out with the bath water,” he said.

It is not that Dubai and the other financial centers in the region welcome any investor regardless of reputation or background, but rather a different approach to the whole process of compliance and due diligence.

“In Dubai, we still have to be vigilant in terms of regulations, but we make an effort to sieve through the clients to separate the acceptable ones from the non-acceptable. The regulatory environment here is just as strict as elsewhere, but it is our willingness to go the extra mile to get to know the client. We spend a lot of money on due diligence and compliance,” he said.

Some analysts have recently added another “headwind” to the region’s challenges, especially in the UAE — a suggestion that key areas of the economy, from real estate to the retail environment through to tourism, are not performing in top gear.

Sifri does not agree with the pessimists. “On the local economy, the numbers from the IMF (International Monetary Fund) are probably more reliable than a view based on your choice of time to go to the mall. And the numbers suggest a positive view on the regional and local economy.

“The evidence on the streets of Dubai is probably more related to a supply overhang of goods and services, along with a reduction in demand. The supply side has built up massively in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, related to the growth in infrastructure and real estate,” he added.

But he recognized that there are some issues still to be resolved, especially in the property market. “Real estate is where the impact is greatest from the supply/demand formula. Dubai is in a particular condition because real estate increased dramatically as the emirate opened up. The cost of living has gone up quite a bit, and that is beginning to have an impact on life in Dubai,” he said, referring to a recent decision by Amazon to locate big chunks of its regional operations in Bahrain as a sign that the UAE is becoming an expensive place to do business.

Sifri believes that recent actions on fees, charges and levies in the UAE are positive signs that the issue is being addressed.

“I don’t want to look like I’m advising the government what to do, but in the region there have been two choices: The government can put limits on prices for schools and rents, for example. We saw it in Kuwait, where rents have been capped for a long time in some places.

“In the UAE the government has generally taken a view that it should not force prices down, but instead chose to increase the supply of goods and services. In the education sector, there has been a cap put on fees, but that is intended to address only a handful of schools that are top-end and especially in demand,” he said.

Many of EIB’s clients are wealthy Saudi Arabian investors, so he has had an opportunity to gauge the investment environment in the Kingdom as the big transformation of Vision 2030 kicks in.

“Saudi Arabia is going through a significant transition which happens to coincide with a sudden change in the ruling conditions. The Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is introducing dramatic changes, all of which appear to be positive. But there is a sensitivity about changing too fast.

“The aspirations are in the right direction and have broad support in the Kingdom and across the region. The majority of people want their aspirations to be fulfilled,” he said.

“But the bigger question is how and how long it will all take. Is it a long road to transformation, or is there a short cut? It’s like crossing the Grand Canyon: Do you go straight down and up in a straight line, or is it better to go around the valley to find an easier path?” Sifri asked.

He thinks the direct approach has advantages. “There was definitely a need to do something dramatic in the Kingdom. In the past, policy has been to change incrementally, like walking round the valley.

“The economic opportunity for investors is very significant, but it also carries a significant amount of risk, and each investor needs to decide what level of risk they are conformable with. The geopolitical environment is one of these risks and might deter some investors. As a bank, we’re quite bullish on the KSA economy. It is a meaningful part of our business. We believe it will succeed in overcoming the geopolitical factors,” he said.

Sifri said that he had detected no signs of what some analysts have called “capital fight” on the part of Saudi investors. “No, we have not seen that. In fact, many prominent Saudis are pulling capital back in to the country. We have seen some repatriate capital recently. With complete sincerity, we have not seen any capital flight,” he said.

Inflows and outflows of capital are, in any case, a historic phenomenon in the Middle East, which are determined by global rather than regional conditions, he said. But these would not halt the region’s long-term ambition to be a leading wealth management center, with local and regional institutions in the vanguard of that trend.

“People have decided they had more control over their assets in a local bank. Even if they are doing international investments from a base here, they have more control over the relationship,” he said.

By way of illustration, Sifri told an anecdote about an important regional client who explained why he wanted to deal with a regional bank. “He said to me: ‘If you do something with my money I don’t approve of, even if I may not know your chairman personally, I will certainly know somebody who does. If anything goes wrong in a Swiss bank, I do not have that kind of control,’ he told me. That’s a big attraction,” Sifri added.