London tube and buses chosen to highlight anti-Muslim hate crime

Police officers and anti-hate crime campaigners visited London communities and transport infrastructure on Monday to raise awareness and urge better reporting of hate crimes. (Photo courtesy: Transport for London (TfL)
Updated 17 October 2017
0

London tube and buses chosen to highlight anti-Muslim hate crime

LONDON: A campaign against anti-Muslim hate crime was launched across London buses and tubes on Monday.
Transport for London (TfL) and police in the UK capital are working together on 200 events across in support of the broader National Hate Crime Awareness Week.
Muslims have been the targets of several attacks on London buses and tubes — some of which have been posted on YouTube and other social media.
Spikes in anti-Muslim hate crime were recorded in both London and Manchester following terror attacks in the cities this summer as innocent members of the public became victims of violence and abuse.
Newspaper reports over the summer reveal numerous incidents involving attacks on Muslims in the capital ranging from an acid attack on two cousins in East London to a woman who had a hijab ripped from her head at Baker Street tube station.
Between April and June 2017, reports of hate crime on the transport network of the capital increased by a quarter to 822 compared with the same period last year, according to official figures.
“Every so often, a member of our congregation can find themselves being abused on London’s transport network, and we want to send a clear message, that you do not have to be afraid and that you can report incidents discreetly to the police,” said Nozmul Hussain, CEO of the East London Mosque Trust.
Police officers visited communities in east London yesterday along with TfL staff and representatives from Tell Mama – a reporting service for victims of anti-Muslim hate crime.
They urged people to report hate crimes and stressed that “London’s public transport system is safe and welcoming for all.”
“London represents one of the most diverse capital cities in the world, and we will never tolerate those that seek to divide us through hatred and bigotry we will always stand united,” said Detective Superintendent Adnan Qureshi from the Met’s Roads and Transport Policing Command.


Djibouti asks UN help to end border dispute with Eritrea

Djibouti’s UN ambassador, Mohamed Siad Doualeh. (Courtesy: Youtube)
Updated 31 min 49 sec ago
0

Djibouti asks UN help to end border dispute with Eritrea

  • Eritrea had successfully resolved a dispute with Yemen over their sea boundary and a Red Sea island through binding international arbitration
  • Djibouti accused Eritrean troops of occupying the Dumeira mountain area

UNITED NATIONS: Djibouti is asking Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to help peacefully resolve a border dispute with Eritrea following the recent end to that nation’s 20-year border dispute with Ethiopia.
Djibouti’s UN ambassador, Mohamed Siad Doualeh, asked Guterres in a letter circulated Wednesday to work with the Security Council to bring his tiny port nation and Eritrea together “with the aim of facilitating an agreement between them upon a mutually acceptable means of peaceful dispute settlement.”
He said Djibouti’s preference would be to refer the dispute “to judicial settlement or arbitration” that would be legally binding.
Djibouti’s appeal to the UN chief follows the dramatic diplomatic thaw to one of Africa’s longest-running conflicts that began last month when Ethiopia’s reformist new prime minister fully accepted a peace deal that ended a 1998-2000 border war with Eritrea that killed tens of thousands.
Doualeh recalled that the Security Council imposed sanctions on Eritrea in 2009 “because of its aggression against Djibouti and its refusal to withdraw its troops from the disputed area, and its rejection of all efforts aimed at mediating between the two parties.”
Djibouti accused Eritrean troops of occupying the Dumeira mountain area shortly after the peacekeepers left on June 13, 2017, and lodged a formal complaint with the African Union.
“Eritrean forces continue to occupy Djiboutian territory, prisoners of war remain unaccounted for, threats of force continue to emanate from the Eritrean side and the risk of violent confrontation is once again high,” Doualeh said.
He warned that without any effort to end the border dispute, the UN monitoring group has said “the situation on the ground remains vulnerable to provocation by both parties, which could result in the rapid escalation of conflict.”
“There is thus an urgent need for a new dispute settlement mechanism,” Doualeh said.
He said Djibouti applauds the secretary-general’s recent decision to refer a longstanding border dispute between Venezuela and Guyana to the International Court of Justice. He also noted that Eritrea had successfully resolved a dispute with Yemen over their sea boundary and a Red Sea island through binding international arbitration.
Doualeh said Djibouti will “consider in good faith any proposals that you or the Security Council might make with regard to the appropriate means of peaceful dispute settlement.”