Hollywood’s Katzenberg says Weinstein “a monster” in a wolf pack

Film producer Jeffrey Katzenberg speaks at The Wall Street Journal’s three-day D.Live technology conference in Laguna Beach, California, on October 16, 2017. (File photo by AFP)
Updated 17 October 2017
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Hollywood’s Katzenberg says Weinstein “a monster” in a wolf pack

LAGUNA BEACH, United States: Hollywood titan Jeffrey Katzenberg branded fallen movie mogul Harvey Weinstein “a monster” who was far from alone in sexually preying on actresses.
“Make no mistake about it, he is a monster,” Katzenberg said of Weinstein during an on-stage interview late Monday at the Wall Street Journal D.Live conference in Laguna Beach, California.
“The problem is there is a pack of wolves; he is not a lone actor in this. That is what we really need to find a way to deal with.”
More than two dozen actresses including marquee stars like Gwyneth Paltrow, Angelina Jolie and Mira Sorvino have come forward saying they were sexually harassed by the producer.
Since the allegations emerged this month, Hollywood has largely turned its back on Weinstein.
“I am a hundred percent certain Harvey Weinstein was not alone in this,” said Katzenberg, who was chairman of Walt Disney Studios for a decade until 1994. He was even Weinstein’s boss for a while after Disney bought the Weinstein brothers’ Miramax production company in 1993.
Katzenberg said he did “a lot of soul-searching” regarding how he could have missed any clues that Weinstein abused his position when it came to actresses getting roles in films.
“There are two Harvey’s,” Katzenberg said.
“Somehow or other, this behavior was masked from me by him.”
He credited the courage of women who have spoken out, and said that “anyone in a leadership position in Hollywood today” is thinking about how to address the problem the situation has spotlighted.


Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

A still from the film.
Updated 19 July 2018
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Pressures and pains that tear a couple apart

DENVER: Like a gallery wall-sized enlargement of a microscopic image, “Scenes from a Marriage” is all about size, space and perspective.
Directed by Ingmar Bergman — whose birth centenary was marked this week — at 281 minutes long, its unwieldly length presents an intimidating canvas, yet the claustrophobic intimacy of its gaze is unprecedented: The two leads are alone in nearly every scene, many of which play out for more than a half-hour at a time.
Premiered in 1973, the work is technically a TV mini-series, but such is its legend that theaters continue to program its nearly five-hour arc in its entirety. A three-hour cinematic edit was prepared for US theater consumption a year later (it won the Golden Globe Award for Best Foreign Language Film, but was ruled ineligible for the corresponding Oscar).
Not a lot a happens but, then again, everything does. Shot over four months on a shoestring budget, its six chapters punctuate the period of a decade. The audience are voyeurs, dropped amid the precious and pivotal moments which may not make up a life, but come to define it.
We meet the affluent Swedish couple Marianne and Johan — played by regular screen collaborators Liv Ullmann and Erland Josephson, both of whom clocked at least 10 Bergman credits — gloating about ten years’ happy marriage to a visiting reporter. This opening magazine photoshoot is the only time we see their two children on camera, and inevitably the image projected is as glossy, reflective and disposable as the paper it will be printed on.
The pressures, pains and communication breakdowns which tear this unsuited pair apart are sadly familiar. The series was blamed for a spike in European divorce rates. It may be difficult to survive the piece liking either lead, but impossible not to emerge sharing deep pathos with them both. Sadly, much of the script is said to be drawn from Bergman’s real-life off-screen relationship with Ullmann.
It’s a hideously humane, surgical close-up likely to leave even the happiest couple groping into the ether on their way out of the cinema.