Did you see the fiery streaks in the sky over the Gulf on Monday? Here is what you saw

The Russian supply rocket breaking up in the sky over the Burj Khalifa (Twitter)
Updated 17 October 2017
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Did you see the fiery streaks in the sky over the Gulf on Monday? Here is what you saw

DUBAI: If you were in the Gulf and looking into the sky on Monday evening, then you might have spotted fiery streaks.
There were sightings reported in Dubai and Abu Dhabi, parts of Saudi Arabia and Bahrain.
Inevitably Twitter was buzzing with speculation as to what people were seeing, with some calling a meteor shower, while others suggested that it might be the International Space Station.
But according to the founder of Dubai Astronomy Group the fire in the sky was actually a Russian space rocket breaking up as it entered Earth’s atmosphere.

“When I analyzed the video it was clear this was falling space debris disintegrating in the atmosphere,” Hasan Al-Hariri told UAE daily The National.
According to the group what people saw on Monday night at about 7 p.m. was debris from a Progress rocket that had been used to supply the International Space Station.
“Such modules are guided in such a way that it burns in the air and does not fall into a populated area. This was of the Progress module that supplies the International Space Station with water, food and equipment. It is an unmanned vehicle that is totally autonomous, it docks at the station, the equipment is removed and it’s sent back where it burns in the atmosphere.”
The debris passed the Arabian Peninsula crossing over the UAE and Oman, the group explained.
But if you were confused and thought it was a meteor, there is no need to be too embarrassed because you were in good company.
Apparently the Dubai Media office initially tweeted “a meteor has passed through the skies of Dubai.”
But Al-Hariri explained to The National that there were differences between a meteor shower and falling debris.
“The clear evidence of a man-made object and event from a natural occurrence of a meteor fall is that meteor fire balls rush in at very high speed and burn in the atmosphere or explode in the sky leaving a trace of gas behind… A meteor glow would have been much bigger than what people saw last night.”
But Twitter users seemed convinced they were watching a meteor shower, which seems reasonable and the images they posted were very impressive.



Internet traffic hijack disrupts Google services

In this Monday, Nov. 5, 2018, photo, a woman carries a fire extinguisher past the logo for Google at the China International Import Expo in Shanghai. Internet traffic hijacking disrupted several Google services Monday, Nov. 12, 2018, including search and cloud-hosting services. (AP)
Updated 13 November 2018
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Internet traffic hijack disrupts Google services

  • Google confirmed Monday’s disruption on a network status page but said only that it believed the cause was “external to Google”

CALIFORNIA: An Internet diversion that rerouted data traffic through Russia and China disrupted several Google services on Monday, including search and cloud-hosting services.
Service interruptions lasted for nearly two hours and ended about 5:30 p.m. EST., network service companies said. In addition to Russian and Chinese telecommunications companies, a Nigerian Internet provider was also involved.
Google confirmed Monday’s disruption on a network status page but said only that it believed the cause was “external to Google.” The company had little additional comment.
The specific method employed, formally known as border gateway protocol hijacking, can knock essential services offline and facilitate espionage and financial theft. Most network traffic to Google services — 94 percent as of October 27 — is encrypted, which shields it from prying eyes even if diverted.
Alex Henthorn-Iwane, an executive at the network-intelligence company ThousandEyes, called Monday’s incident the worst affecting Google that his company has seen.
He said he suspected nation-state involvement because the traffic was effectively landing at state-run China Telecom. A recent study by US Naval War College and Tel Aviv University scholars says China systematically hijacks and diverts US Internet traffic.
Much of the Internet’s underpinnings are built on trust, a relic of the good intentions its designers assumed of users. One consequence: little can be done if a nation-state or someone with access to a major Internet provider decides to reroute traffic.
Henthorn-Iwane says Monday’s hijacking may have been “a war-game experiment.”
In two recent cases, such rerouting has affected financial sites. In April 2017, one affected Mastercard and Visa among other sites. This past April, another hijacking enabled cryptocurrency theft .
The Department of Homeland Security did not immediately respond to a request for comment.
ThousandEyes named the companies involved in Monday’s incident, in addition to China Telecom, as the Russian Internet provider Transtelecom and the Nigerian ISP MainOne.