Powerful explosion rocks Swedish police station

A police officer stands guard outside a cordoned off area surrounding a police station in Helsingborg, Sweden, on Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP)
Updated 18 October 2017
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Powerful explosion rocks Swedish police station

STOCKHOLM: A powerful explosion blew out the entrance to a police station in the southern Swedish city of Helsingborg early Wednesday, an attack authorities linked to their fight against organized crime.
The explosion occurred just after midnight in the city center, which is home to around 100,000 people.
Prime Minister Stefan Lofven called it “an attack against our democracy” and urged authorities to “step up the fight against serious crime.”
The blast, heard from as far away as 20 km, caused no injuries but serious material damage. The police station entrance was completely destroyed, with dozens of windows smashed.
Police sources quoted by daily Aftonbladet said several kilos of explosives were used.
The head of the local police, Patric Heimbrand, told reporters that investigators were working on the presumption that “criminal circles” were behind the attack. He said police work against gangs was paying off and likely causing “irritation.”
Explosives are often used by organized crime rings in Sweden, especially in the south where settling of scores and intimidation are frequent among drug traffickers.
Police and judges are also regularly targeted.
On November 30, 2014, a blast damaged a building in the southern city of Malmo that housed police, prosecutors, a courthouse and penitentiary administration.
Heavily armed police officers were stationed outside those buildings on Wednesday.
Although the Nordic nation has a relatively low crime rate compared to the rest of Europe, physical violence against police officers has surged. In 2016, it rose by 65 percent with 86 cases reported, according to government figures.


South Sudan foes in new peace talks to end deadly war

Updated 58 min 21 sec ago
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South Sudan foes in new peace talks to end deadly war

  • A first round brokered by Ethiopian premier Abiy Ahmed in Addis Ababa on Thursday failed to achieve any breakthrough
  • The war has killed tens of thousands of people and driven about four million others from their homes

KHARTOUM: South Sudanese President Salva Kiir and arch-foe Riek Machar were set to hold a new round of peace talks Monday after a first meeting last week faltered.
Sudanese President Omar Al-Bashir is hosting in Khartoum the second round of talks between the two bitter rivals, aimed at ending South Sudan’s four-and-a-half year brutal civil war.
A first round brokered by Ethiopian premier Abiy Ahmed in Addis Ababa on Thursday failed to achieve any breakthrough.
Regional East African leaders have launched new efforts to secure peace in South Sudan where warring factions face a looming deadline to avert UN sanctions.
The war has killed tens of thousands of people and driven about four million others from their homes.
It erupted after Kiir fell out with his then deputy Machar in December 2013, dashing the optimism that accompanied independence of South Sudan just two years earlier from Sudan.
“In this round of talks we are looking for a breakthrough to this thorny issue,” Sudanese Foreign Minister Al-Dierdiry Ahmed told reporters on Sunday.
Kiir and Machar’s meeting in Addis Ababa was their first face-to-face encounter in nearly two years.
Their meeting in Khartoum will be the first since fighting erupted in South Sudan.
It comes after South Sudan’s government declared that it “had enough” of Machar, dashing hopes of any breakthrough at the Addis Ababa talks.
“As the people of South Sudan, not the president alone, but as the people of South Sudan, we are saying enough is enough,” South Sudanese government spokesman Michael Makuei said Friday.
Makuei rejected Machar’s presence in any transitional government but did not rule out the involvement of other rebel figures.
His remarks show the personal enmity between Kiir and Machar, that lies at the heart of the conflict, is as strong as ever.
Before the start of talks in Ethiopia, Machar’s SPLM-IO rebel group had also dismissed the latest peace efforts as “unrealistic.”
South Sudan descended into civil war after Kiir accused Machar of plotting a coup against him, sparking violence between the two factions that was fueled by brooding ethnic tensions.
Since a 2015 peace deal collapsed in July 2016 with Machar fleeing to South Africa, Kiir’s government has gained the upper hand militarily as the opposition has splintered into a myriad of factions.
Initially largely fought out between South Sudan’s two largest ethnic groups — Kiir’s Dinka and Machar’s Nuer — smaller groups have since spawned their own militias raising question marks about the ability of either leader to halt the war.
In May, the UN Security Council gave the two warring sides a month to reach a peace deal or face sanctions.
A landlocked state with a large ethnic mix, South Sudan gained independence from Sudan in 2011 after a long and brutal war.