French film legend Danielle Darrieux dies aged 100

This file photo shows French actress Danielle Darrieux on the stage of the movie “En haut des marches” by Paul Vecchiali on October 11, 1983. (File photo by AFP)
Updated 19 October 2017
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French film legend Danielle Darrieux dies aged 100

PARIS: Danielle Darrieux, one of France’s most enduring and glamorous film stars despite her wartime collaboration with the Germans, has died aged 100 at her home near Paris, her partner said Thursday.
She became unwell “recently after a little fall,” Jacques Jenvrin told AFP.
With her smoldering good looks and sulky pout, Darrieux became a huge international star in the 1930s, playing opposite Douglas Fairbanks Jr in the Hollywood romance “The Rage of Paris” in 1938.
But her decision to keep working after the Nazis occupied France, and to star in movies made by the studio set up by their propaganda chief Joseph Goebbels, saw her branded as a collaborationist.
However, Darrieux later said that she was forced to take part in a notorious publicity tour to Berlin in 1942 so she could free her husband, the playboy and diplomat Porfirio Rubirosa, who had been interned by the Nazis as a spy.
She left the German-backed studio after he was freed and went into hiding under a false name.
Three years after the war ended she returned to great acclaim in a string of striking roles in Max Ophuls’ “La Ronde,” “Madame de” (“The Earrings of Madame de“) and playing the Queen of Spain in “Ruy Blas” by Jean Cocteau.
Whatever doubts that lingered about her wartime activities were brushed aside by her searing performance in the title role of “Marie-Octobre,” a 1959 thriller about the survivors of a French Resistance network who try to discover who betrayed their murdered leader.
Darrieux — who died on Tuesday — was still working at 99, and lent her voice for the grandmother in Marjane Satrapi’s 2007 animated hit “Persepolis.”
“I went to the studio like one goes to school, I was lazy and I remained so,” she once said of a life spent on set, which began in the comedy “Le Bal” when she was only 14.
She was far from lazy, however, going on to act in more than 140 films and television dramas over the next eight decades.
They including some of the best-loved French postwar films, and she struck up a particular rapport with Jacques Demy, appearing in his “Les Demoiselles de Rochefort” as the mother and “Une chambre en ville” in 1982.


What We Are Watching Today: Good Girls

Updated 20 July 2018
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What We Are Watching Today: Good Girls

Netflix MENA’s latest addition, Good Girls, has humor, character development — and crime.

Three desperate mothers — sisters Beth and Annie, and their best friend Ruby — are tired of working minimum-wage jobs and having unfaithful husbands. They decide to take charge of their lives, by robbing a grocery store. What they don’t realize is that they have stepped on to some very dangerous ground.

Ruby’s relationship with her cop-to-be husband is about what millennials consider “goals,” but as they struggle to fund their ill daughter’s medical treatment and bills, Ruby’s robbery threatens their synchronicity.

It also jeopardizes Annie’s custody battle with her ex-husband over her 11-year-old daughter, Sadie — the two share a harmonious relationship, although bumpy at times, they make it work due to Sadie’s maturity. 

But when it comes to Beth, she is immediately enamored with the danger that comes with their new lives, getting herself more involved to take her mind of her husband’s unfaithfulness.

The series has been picked up for a second season in May, as the short-season concluded with only ten episodes.