Saudi Arabia supports any action against Iranian aggression

Khaled Manzlawiy
Updated 20 October 2017
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Saudi Arabia supports any action against Iranian aggression

NEW YORK: Saudi Arabia announced its full support for any action or sanction that can limit Iranian aggression and intervention in the regions’ countries.

The Kingdom expressed regret that Iran has used the economic returns from the lifting of sanctions after compliance with the nuclear deal, to destabilize the region, develop its ballistic missiles and support terrorism in the region, including Hezbollah, Houthi militias in Yemen and armed militias in Syria.
This was announced by the deputy head of the Saudi permanent representative to the UN, Khaled Manzlawiy, as a reply to the report of the special rapporteur on the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures on the enjoyment of human rights, at the UN session held on Wednesday.
Manzlawiy said: “I reaffirm the Kingdom’s concern to cooperate with the UN and offer all information that can be helpful to the rapporteurs. We have taken note of the report of the special rapporteur on the negative impact of unilateral coercive measures on the enjoyment of human rights and we would like to make some comments.”
Concerning Gaza Strip, Manzlawi stressed the Kingdom’s firm and unwavering position, condemning all forms of Israeli occupation of Palestine and Arab territories.
“Concerning the US sanctions against Iran, I confirm the Kingdom’s full support to any action or sanction that may help decrease Iranian aggression and intervention in the region, and reduce the spread of weapons of mass destruction in our region and the rest of the world. Unfortunately, Iran has abused the economic returns after sanctions were lifted. Instead of using it to achieve development, Iran used it to continue destabilizing the region and support terrorist organizations. We stress the urgent need to find a solution to the international threat of Iranian policies.”
On the Qatari issue, Manzlawiy said: “We urge Qatar to cooperate in eradicating the scourge of extremism and terrorism instead of supporting and financing it, abide by the Riyadh agreement of 2013-2014 and stop destabilizing the security of the neighboring countries. Qatar’s attempt to internationalize the crisis will not help find a solution, but will complicate things more. Qatar should know that such policies are rejected. We hope that Qatar will do the right thing and listen to the international community.”
Manzlawiy said: “The Kingdom welcomes the US initiative to lift the economic sanctions that were imposed on Sudan, and we hope that this will boost the country’s development and prosperity.”
“Regarding the Yemeni crisis, the Kingdom grants its full support to the solution of the UN envoy to Yemen that requires the formation of two committees (administrative-financial and technical) to supervise Hodeidah Port, transfer the profits to the government, and ensure that Houthi militias do not use it to smuggle and transport weapons and arms,” said Manzlawiy.


Hodeidah offensive: Coalition forces seize weapons supplied by Iran to Houthis

Arab coalition spokesman Col. Turki Al-Maliki speaks during a press conference in Riyadh. (AN photo by Bashir Saleh)
Updated 20 June 2018
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Hodeidah offensive: Coalition forces seize weapons supplied by Iran to Houthis

  • The arsenal included drones, a sniper rifle, roadside bombs disguised as rocks and even a “drone boat” which had been filled with explosives that failed to detonate.
  • Equipment used to produce and load fuel for rockets that target Saudi Arabia contained Iranian labels.

JEDDAH: Saudi-led coalition officials on Tuesday displayed weapons and explosives supplied by Iran to Houthi militias in the Yemeni port city of Hodeidah. 

The arsenal included drones, a sniper rifle, roadside bombs disguised as rocks and even a “drone boat” which had been filled with explosives that failed to detonate.

Equipment used to produce and load fuel for rockets that target Saudi Arabia contained Iranian labels. The weapons were captured on the battlefield in Hodeidah and displayed at a military base in the UAE. 

“Unsurprisingly, there are advanced military components in the Houthi militias’ hands,” said Talal Al-Teneiji, an official at the UAE Foreign Ministry.

“We took time to inspect and disassemble these to figure out the source ... and we can say that these elements are military-grade materials imported from Iran to the Houthi militias.”

As the week-long offensive in Hodeidah intensified on Tuesday, coalition forces consolidated their grip on the city’s airport and there was new fighting on the main coast road leading to the city center, with Apache helicopters providing air support to the coalition. 

“We can hear the sounds of artillery, mortars and sporadic machinegun fire. The Houthis have been using tanks,” one civilian on the coastal strip said. 

“Water has been cut off to many of the areas near the corniche area because the Houthis have dug trenches and closed water pipes.”

At the airport, which the coalition has controlled since Saturday, their forces stormed the main compound and took full command.

UAE Minister of State for Foreign Affairs Anwar Gargash said: “We are waiting for the Houthis to realize the sort of military and psychological blow that they got with the airport ... we are giving them time to decide if they want to save the city ... and pull out.”

Oubai Shahbandar, a strategic communications adviser, told Arab News that “without the sea and airport of Hodeidah, the Houthi militia has effectively lost the war.”

They should agree to UN-hosted peace talks and not prolong the fighting. “The tide in this conflict has clearly turned in favor of the Arab coalition and the welfare of the Yemeni people ought to be paramount,” he said.