Suspect held in Munich knife assault

The attacker is reportedly on the run (Twitter)
Updated 21 October 2017
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Suspect held in Munich knife assault

BERLIN: A man with a knife attacked eight people in Munich on Saturday and then fled, police said. The suspected assailant, a local German already known to police for theft and other offenses, was arrested a few hours later.
No one was seriously hurt in the attack that started at around 8.30 a.m. in the Haidhausen area, east of downtown Munich. Police said they believe it was not a terror attack, they suspect instead that the assailant had psychological problems.
The lone attacker apparently went after passers-by indiscriminately with a knife, police said. He attacked eight people in all, including a 12-year-old child, at different sites. They mainly had superficial stab wounds and in at least one case had been hit.
About three hours later, police arrested a man matching a description they had issued based on witness reports. They said he was heavy, unshaven with short blond hair and had a black bicycle and a backpack.
The 33-year-old suspect, who was carrying a knife when he was arrested, was already known to police for bodily harm, drug offenses and theft, city police chief Hubertus Andrae told reporters.
The suspect did not immediately give police any information on his motive. “There are absolutely no indications at present of a terrorist, political or religious background, though we can only rule things out when all the questioning is finished,” Andrae said. “Rather than that, we believe that the perpetrator had psychological problems.”
He said police have “no serious doubts” that the suspect was the assailant, and that there was no longer any danger to the public.


Police papers say Toronto shooter ‘emotionally disturbed’

The attack ended after Hussain exchanged fire with two officers and then was found dead nearby (The Canadian Press/AP)
Updated 17 min 51 sec ago
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Police papers say Toronto shooter ‘emotionally disturbed’

  • Faisal Hussain was described as a loner
  • Police documents say Hussain fatally shot himself after the July 22 rampage

TORONTO: The man who went on a shooting rampage that killed two people and wounded 13 in Toronto was an emotionally disturbed loner and did not appear to act out of any particular ideological motivation, according to police documents released Thursday.
The redacted documents also say Faisal Hussain fatally shot himself after the July 22 rampage.
The documents were written by officers in support of obtaining search warrants. They also indicate Hussain had been arrested for shoplifting two days before the shooting but was released.
The papers say Hussain had three dealings with police as an “emotionally distressed person” in 2010.
Hussain’s twin brother told investigators his sibling once robbed a store with a gun and had called police to say he wanted to kill himself.
“For the last couple years, Faisal has had no real friends,” the brother is quoted as saying. “He started attending the mosque with his father but did not seem that interested in religion.”
The mass shooting in Toronto’s Greektown neighborhood stunned people in the normally safe city, which was already unsettled by an attack just three months earlier when a man used a van to plow over pedestrians on a downtown sidewalk, killing 10 and injuring 14 while apparently aiming at women.
According to one detective cited in the documents, Hussain’s cellphone was ringing repeatedly when his body was found. An officer answered the phone to discover it was Hussain’s parents frantically trying to reach him, the documents say. The officer advised them to go to a police station.
Police used a dog trained to detect explosives when they searched Hussain’s home. What the dog found is partially redacted in the documents, but a white powdery substance — possibly cocaine — was found in a drawer.
The papers also describe several witness statements, including one man who said Hussain walked casually and was smiling as he fired his lethal rounds. The attack ended after Hussain exchanged fire with two officers and then was found dead nearby.
A day after the shooting, Hussain’s parents issued a statement outlining their son’s battle with depression and psychosis. They also decried Hussain’s “senseless violence,” described his actions as “horrific,” and offered condolences to families of his victims.
But the documents say that in an interview with police, Hussain’s father said his son had no mental health issues.
Hussain’s mother told police she had never seen her son with a gun, the documents say, but she described him as a loner who never had a girlfriend.
On the night of the shooting, she “told her son that he should get married and find a nice wife,” the documents state. “He left the house that evening to go for a walk around 8:30 p.m. never to return.”
His mother said Hussain didn’t use drugs, had shown no major changes in behavior and never talked about guns or appeared angry, the documents say.
His father described taking him on a trip to Pakistan a few years ago.
“Faisal was happy on the trip and did not want to return because people left him alone there,” the documents quote the father as saying.
The father told an officer that he had forced Hussain to attend mosque “as he does not go willingly.” He said his son didn’t smile much and stayed in his room playing video games.
Hussain was working two part-time jobs at the time he died, the documents say.