Spanish company leads bidding for Aramco gas projects

A view shows Saudi Aramco's Wasit Gas Plant, Saudi Arabia, December 8, 2014. Picture taken December 8, 2014. Saudi Aramco/Handout via REUTERS ATTENTION EDITORS - THIS PICTURE WAS PROVIDED BY A THIRD PARTY. NO RESALES. NO ARCHIVE.
Updated 24 October 2017
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Spanish company leads bidding for Aramco gas projects

ALKHOBAR: Tecnicas Reunidas has offered the lowest bids to build two gas projects which are planned by Saudi Aramco, sources familiar with the plans said on Monday.
While the Spanish engineering firm has made the lowest bids on the Haradh and Hawiyah gas compression stations and the Hawiyah gas plant, Italy’s Saipem and Samsung E&C are also well placed to win the Hawiyah gas plant work, they said.
The new gas compression plants and the expansion of the Hawiyah gas plant are expected to cost more than $4 billion, industry sources have estimated.
Saudi Aramco does not comment on its business transactions, it said in response to an emailed request for comment.
Tecnicas Reunidas declined to comment, while Saipem had no comment and a spokesman for Samsung Engineering said it had no new information on the
bidding progress.
“We expect results to be announced (at the) beginning of November,” he said.
Hawiyah and Haradh are part of Ghawar, the world’s largest onshore oilfield.
Gas will play a key role in the diversified energy mix which Saudi Arabia is keen to achieve by cutting the use of crude oil and liquids for power generation, while allocating more gas to fuel economic growth and industrialization.
The Kingdom is targeting raising the use of gas in its energy mix to 70 percent, officials have said.
Despite falling oil prices, Saudi Aramco is pushing ahead with oil and gas projects that it has highlighted as a priority for the long term to keep the world well supplied with oil, while meeting domestic gas demand.
It plans to nearly double gas production to 23 billion standard cubic feet a day in the next decade.
 


Sri Lanka calls for global coalition to tackle rising dollar

Updated 23 October 2018
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Sri Lanka calls for global coalition to tackle rising dollar

  • The island’s currency bottomed out at a record-low 174.12 rupees to the dollar
  • The rupee has shed more than 12 percent of its value this year and Sri Lanka fears it could slide further

COLOMBO: Sri Lanka on Tuesday called for a “coalition of the willing” to help stabilize free-falling emerging market currencies around the globe, as the beleaguered rupee slumped to fresh lows.
The island’s currency bottomed out at a record-low 174.12 rupees to the dollar, resisting a slew of measures by policymakers to arrest its steady decline.
The rupee has shed more than 12 percent of its value this year and Sri Lanka fears it could slide further as US sanctions squeeze Iran, the island’s chief source of oil.
A stronger dollar has made it difficult for emerging markets to repay debts and battered global currencies from Turkey to India and Argentina.
Finance Minister Mangala Samaraweera invited those nations experiencing currency crises to visit Colombo and hash out a strategy.
“The rise of the dollar is having a serious impact on our currencies. We are not the only one affected,” he told reporters in the Sri Lankan capital.
“I want to build a coalition of the willing to deal with this problem. I don’t see the global situation improving any time soon.”
Washington pulled out of a landmark 2015 nuclear deal with Iran in May and has been reimposing punishing sanctions on the Islamic republic, targeting in particular its financial system.
Iran not only supplies Sri Lanka with most of its oil, but is one of its chief buyers of the island’s celebrated tea.
Samaraweera has warned that blockading Iran will have ripple on effects on Sri Lanka, which has been unable to stop the rupee from nose diving.
Last month, Colombo curbed its state institutions and public servants from importing cars to reduce the outflow of foreign capital.
Banks were also ordered to restrict lending for purchasing overseas and consumer goods, but the rupee has continued its decline.
In August, the government substantially increased taxes on small cars to discourage imports, but officials said there was still pressure on foreign exchange reserves to finance big-ticket imports.