Jazzing up the Kingdom: Music fest planned as reforms take hold

Saudi Arabian singer Rashed Al-Majed peforms during a concert in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. (REUTERS)
Updated 26 October 2017
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Jazzing up the Kingdom: Music fest planned as reforms take hold

RIYADH: A Saudi Arabian industrial zone plans to host a jazz festival around the end of this year as it moves into tourism and entertainment, a result of economic reforms designed to end the Kingdom’s reliance on oil exports.
In January, Jeddah hosted Saudi Arabia’s first major public concert in over a decade, featuring Arab music.
Reforms launched by Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman are changing the business environment. The crown prince has identified tourism and entertainment as key industries to develop because of their potential to create jobs.
Fahd Al-Rasheed, group chief executive of Emaar the Economic City (EEC), which is developing the King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC) on the Red Sea coast near Jeddah, said he aimed to have foreign musicians perform at the jazz festival.
Al-Rasheed said it was not clear whether current visa rules would permit a large foreign audience at the festival, but predicted heavy demand for tickets among Saudi citizens.
“There is a huge, untapped demand for events and cultural performances like this,” he said in an interview on Wednesday on the sidelines of an international conference promoting Saudi Arabia as an investment destination.
The jazz plan underlines a shift of emphasis at KAEC since the crown prince started his reforms last year.


Saudi Arabia's aid agency funds hospital in Syria with medical supplies

The project has been signed with the Union of Medical Care and Relief Organizations. (SPA)
Updated 20 November 2018
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Saudi Arabia's aid agency funds hospital in Syria with medical supplies

  • Al-Moallem said KSRelief had also extended the duration of two of its existing WASH projects, which he said were to ensure potable water supply and hygiene to help in maintaining health and preventing disease

RIYADH: Stepping up humanitarian efforts in Syria, the King Salman Center for Humanitarian Aid and Relief (KSRelief) signed a health project to ensure uninterrupted medical service in the war-torn country by providing funds and medical supplies for Bab Al-Hawa Hospital, and also extended water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) projects to help the people.
Director for Health and the Environmental Aid Department at KSRelief, Dr. Abdullah Saleh Al-Moallem, told Arab News on Monday: “KSRelief signed the health services support project for Bab Al-Hawa Hospital, which is the biggest hospital in northern Syria.
“The health service project’s cost is $3.528 million and will serve about a million people.”
He added that the project agreement is for one year and includes all operations for the hospital by meeting expenses including salaries and providing medical supplies including equipment to ensure uninterrupted medical service to the people.
The project has been signed with the Union of Medical Care and Relief Organizations (UOSSM), which is an implementing partner, he said.
Al-Moallem added that Bab Al-Hawa is a specialized hospital, the flagship of health care in northern Syria, and the hospital staff provide much-needed health care in the war-hit country.

Specialized services
Some of its specialized services include cardiology, pediatrics, gynecology and surgeries including neurological surgery, he added.
The hospital also boasts a state-of-the-art training center, where a wide variety of medical and other health care-related courses are run to develop the skills and knowledge of all health care staff in the hospital itself, as well as in the wider health care community.
The hospital is operated under the auspices of UOSSM. Al-Moallem said KSRelief had also extended the duration of two of its existing WASH projects, which he said were to ensure potable water supply and hygiene to help in maintaining health and preventing disease.
One project is to rehabilitate water supply and solid waste management systems, and another aims to improve the sustainable provision of water to the facility, he said, adding that the combined costs for both projects are to the tune of $2.45 million.
As KSRelief remains committed to providing aid to the Syrian people at all levels, the team from the Center also reviewed various ways to expand support for its projects to support Syrian IDPs (internally Displaced people) and refugees in neighboring countries.