Designers share their thoughts on Dubai fashion event

Utruj is taking the Dubai fashion scene by storm. (Photo supplied)
Updated 28 October 2017
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Designers share their thoughts on Dubai fashion event

Dubai Design District is playing host to the 10th annual Fashion Forward showcase in Dubai, an event that is a “celebration” featuring runway shows, presentations, exhibitions, talks, shopping, music and film.

Previously invite only, this event — that runs from Oct. 26-28 — is now open to all fashion lovers in the region. Arab News speaks with three designers who are contributing to this unforgettable fashion event, known to fashionistas as FFWD.

Hussein Bazaza, a designer based in Beirut, felt a desire for artistic expression from an early age. Having studied in Paris and with Elie Saab in Lebanon, Bazaza created his first collection in 2012. Through his designs, and with “every cut,” Bazaza works to reflect “a different story, a personal emotion that creates a one-of-a-kind experience. (It is) fashion with a soul.”

Can you tell us a bit about the collection you are showcasing?
The story behind the SS18 collection revolves around the battle between all five personas that make up one’s ultimate character and in the end, the winner dominates it. Composed of 40 looks in total; each of our five characters walk the runway in eight looks. The primary color is pink, but there are touches of different hues obvious in every character. You can spot shimmering silvers at first, light pinks appear next, striking reds follow, then strong blacks make an entrance and, finally, vibrant golds end the show.

Why is it important to take part in this Dubai-based event?
As I see that Dubai has become the fashion capital of the Middle East, FFWD is always great exposure. After showcasing many seasons at FFWD, the FFWD family are dear to my heart — it is now like a second home to me. They are very well organized and incredibly professional with the entire process from the very beginning until even after it ends.


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Saudi designer Sadeem Al-Shehail is also at FFWD with SADEEM, a pret-a-couture fashion brand. Designed for a woman “who is confident, elegant and sophisticated; a woman who is looking for timeless, well-made and versatile attire,” Al-Shehail’s collection is based on sustainable design and ethical practices. To that end, she only collaborates with companies that share the same principles.

Can you tell us a bit about the collection you are showcasing?
This collection, “NAUTICAL by Sadeem,” cultivates a luxury wardrobe that caters for a contemporary woman on a summer holiday. Inspired by sailor suits, sea shell shapes and the glamorous yachting lifestyle, the collection offers timeless silhouettes, from daytime chic to sophisticated soiree looks. I am proud that my company produces a sustainable and eco-friendly line and all fabrics used are certified non-toxic materials made in Japan. Also, the garments were ethically constructed in Dubai’s very own Design District.

Why is it important to take part in this Dubai-based event, as compared to other international fashion events you have attended?
I have had the privilege of showcasing some of my previous collections in New York and in Paris and I was very happy about the positive feedback I received. However, I must say that showing my collection in Dubai has had more of an impact. In my experience, emerging designers showing in Europe and the US always struggle to find the perfect agency that can properly represent them as not many are enthused as the competition is very high. FFWD is the best platform in the Middle East and North Africa region, providing emerging and rising fashion designers the proper brand recognition and exposure. The team that manages the event (is comprised of) brilliant international industry professionals and they put forward their extensive knowledge in all aspects. It is a joy to be a part of FFWD.






Utruj, a design house based in Jeddah, is led by creative director Laila Abduljawad. The brand is named after a type of citrus fruit that is both bitter and sweet, a clear symbol of the brand. Utruj espouses a new vision of contemporary modest wear that women today can truly identify with and with Abduljawad at the helm, the brand can look forward to many more years of redefining design.

Can you tell us a bit about the collection you are showcasing?
This collection is called “Authentic Structure” and it depicts stories that merge imagination with reality. Each piece in the collection is a visual representation of a social construct — the structures reflect our societies and reflect ourselves as Middle Eastern. Furthermore, the focus of this Utruj collection is on shapes — the intricate shapes of traditional forms of art and architecture that embellish the rural region of Saudi Arabia. It signifies a confident woman who values her traditions, but who wants to work practically and look modern. The modern millennial will to be proud to wear (pieces) from this collection as it represents faith and creativity.

Why is it important to take part in this Dubai-based event?
We need a new vision of contemporary modest wear that women today can truly identify with. We aim to universalize the abaya and we want to bridge the gap between the Gulf and the rest of the world — we know that Dubai is a perfect place to push that. It is in the Middle East (but has) international and Western exposure. We have see that Middle Eastern designers are afraid of the abaya, that it may not be well received. But we are not afraid, we are proud and now — after showing this collection in Paris and Europe and receiving such strong, positive feedback — we can bring this collection back to Dubai. For us as a brand, we want to see Middle East engagement — now it is for you guys, it is for our own culture to celebrate.



29-year-old Saudi designer breaks down barriers between fashion and art

Updated 21 July 2018
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29-year-old Saudi designer breaks down barriers between fashion and art

  • Art meets fashion in these thought-provoking sneaker designs, thanks to a Saudi designer with a foot in both worlds
  • The Nou Project is anything but a traditional Saudi sneaker brand — the shoes are unisex.

DUBAI: A university project turned lifelong career is not what Riyadh-born Nour Al-Tamimi had in mind when she first stepped into the world of art.
But the 29-year-old designer has managed to do just that, breaking down the barriers between fashion and art with striking clothing designs. Now Al-Tamimi has created the Kingdom’s first sneaker brand, which “speaks the truth” by featuring striking and often thought-provoking  artwork.

The Nou Project is anything but a traditional Saudi sneaker brand — the shoes are unisex. “That was the biggest thing for me, being Saudi,” Al-Tamimi said. “I was excited to come up with something that was unisex, something that Saudi men and women could wear as equals. People asked about creating flats or cute clutch bags — but I wanted to appeal to both sexes and have them find a common ground.”

Al-Tamimi’s artistic journey began at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts in Boston, where she gained a bachelor of fine arts. Soon after, she was on her way to Milan, where she was awarded a master’s in fashion at the renowned Istituto Marangoni. Later, in Los Angeles, she pursued a master’s in art business at the Sotheby’s Institute of Art. “I was always into art and fashion,” Al-Tamimi said.  “I ended up doing my last semester in New York City, where I got blisters from walking around in flat shoes or stilettos. That’s whenI realized I wanted to invest in a cool pair of sneakers for daily use.”

Riyadh-born Nour Al-Tamimi

As part of the course, Al-Tamimi had to develop a business plan for a project to benefit the art world. That was when her idea came to life. “I thought it would be cool to cater to sneaker-heads and art collectors,” she said. “I wanted to have really cool sneakers with limited art and to have art on a different platform. New York, as a city, was inspirational, and it became about combining my passion for art and fashion.”

Following her graduation, Al-Tamimi spent time at an art market website that collaborated with artists to produce furniture and other household items. “It was a valuable experience,” she said. “I decided to make my business plan a reality and I met my co-creative director Basma Chidiac in New York.”

Featuring pop and street art, Al-Tamimi’s leather shoes became an instant hit. One design features water pistols by artist James Rawson, whose work addresses issues of the past 50 years, including over-consumption and global inequality.

Another favorite and a bestseller for the Nou Project includes work by Eric Yahnker with his “AirObama Cares” — a portrait of former US president Barack Obama “giving the finger”. Yahnker used gouache, a paintbrush, colored pencils and a roll of watercolor paper to create what he calls “a crude gesture that many of us may wish he would use, but are grateful he doesn’t.” Although Al-Tamimi loved the idea, the gesture caused some doubts.
“I showed it to my mother, who asked how I could put that on a shoe and wondered what people would think or say,” she said. “But it became our bestseller, so it’s important to remember that art is all about things that are shocking. It’s about commenting on current affairs and pointing out issues.”

The designer received requests from customers in Miami suggesting an artwork of Trump blow-drying his hair. “Those shoes point to the value of art and art history,” she said.

One of Al-Tamimi’s favorite pieces is by fellow Saudi artist Rexchouk, who works out of a SoHo studio in New York and has been featured in the artist program of the Walton Fine Arts Gallery in London.

“I admired his courage and the way he never studied art but knew this was his passion and what he wanted to do,” she said. “It’s really nice to support each other as Saudis.

He is one of the artists who means a lot to me. But I love them all — I was really excited about our collaboration with the Untitled Art Fair in Miami last December because we did 55 pairs with three artists showcasing there.”

Although the journey has been challenging for Al-Tamimi since she started in 2015, it has been worthwhile. “I had no idea this would become my life today,” she said. “It’s exciting to be the first Saudi sneaker brand — that’s a milestone in itself.” The designer believes the opening of art galleries in both Riyadh and Jeddah will make it easier for aspiring Saudi artists to enter the market. “I’m so proud of all of them,” Al-Tamimi said.

“I would tell young Saudi women looking to start their own business to work with other startups as they encourage each other to grow. We are all in a creative industry, so helping each other out will help you to stay ahead of the game.”

Decoder

What is the Nou Project?

It is an artist-designed sneaker brand featuring illustrated pieces that turn footwear into wearable art. Conceived by Riyadh-born Nour Al-Tamimi and creative director Lebanese Basma Chidiac, the brand supports emerging artists by providing them with a platform to gain recognition. With minimal lines and stitching, the high-top grain leather sneakers are presented as a blank canvas for each artist to creatively showcase their artwork. The limited-edition sneakers are numbered from one to 300, making each pair a collectible. Inspired by asphalt and street art, the soles feature a unique grainy recycled rubber. In future, a portion of the revenue will be donated to a charity selected in collaboration with each artist. Nou Project sneakers can be found on www.thenouproject.co