New York attacker one of our soldiers, Daesh claims

Sayfullo Saipov, an immigrant from Uzbekistan, was charged with terrorism offenses after he mowed down pedestrians and cyclists at high speed on a bike path of Lower’s Manhattan’s West Side. (AFP)
Updated 03 November 2017
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New York attacker one of our soldiers, Daesh claims

WASHINGTON: The attacker who killed eight people in a truck rampage in New York on Tuesday was a “soldier” of the Daesh group, the jihadists said Thursday, according to a US-based monitoring group.
“One of the soldiers of the Islamic State attacked a number of crusaders on a street in New York City,” said an article in the latest issue of the group’s Al-Naba weekly newspaper, according to the SITE Intelligence Group.
Sayfullo Saipov, 29, an immigrant from Uzbekistan, is charged with terrorism offenses after allegedly driving a rented pickup truck down a mile-long stretch of bike path in Manhattan.
The charging document says he confessed to acting in the name of Daesh and “felt good about what he had done,” even demanding to hang a Daesh flag in his hospital room.
Police said he appeared to have followed very closely “the instructions” that Daesh put out to its followers on social media.
He was allegedly in possession of three knives, thousands of Daesh propaganda images and dozens of videos that showed Daesh fighters killing prisoners.
The picture of Saipov that has emerged is of a suspect who only radicalized after moving to the US in 2010.
“The grace of Allah, the operation instilled fear in crusader America, prompting them to increase security measures and intensify actions against immigrants to America,” Daesh said in the Al-Naba article, according to SITE.
After a gunman shot dead 58 people last month in Las Vegas, Daesh claimed the killer was also one of its “soldiers” but the FBI said it found no such links with the accused, Stephen Paddock.


Australians rally in support of Muslims after mosques massacre

Updated 22 March 2019
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Australians rally in support of Muslims after mosques massacre

  • Hundreds of Australians on Friday took to the streets in a mass show of support for Muslim communities
  • Crowds from a range of ethnic backgrounds carried banners and chanted slogans backing Muslims

ADELAIDE: Hundreds of Australians on Friday took to the streets in a mass show of support for Muslim communities in the wake of last week’s terror attack on two mosques in New Zealand, which left 50 people dead. 
A huge rally took place in the center of Adelaide, the capital of South Australia, a week to the day since the shootings in Christchurch.
And students at The University of Adelaide staged their own gathering in front of the main campus to express solidarity and denounce racism.
Crowds from a range of ethnic backgrounds carried banners and chanted slogans backing Muslims and other minority groups as they marched in the city’s Rundle Mall. They also criticized the Australian Border Force for its policies toward immigrants.
In cities throughout Australia people, shocked by the attacks on worshippers at the Al-Noor and Linwood mosques, rallied to condemn extremism and racial hate.
New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern described the atrocity as the darkest day in her country’s history.