Enjoy a tête-à-tête over tea at the Kempinski Al-Othman in Saudi Arabia’s Alkhobar

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If you have a sweet tooth, this is the perfect spot. (Photo courtesy: Shaistha Khan)
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The lounge offers a wide array of treats.
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The food and service are impressive.
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From sweet treats to savory delights, this lounge has it all.
Updated 05 November 2017
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Enjoy a tête-à-tête over tea at the Kempinski Al-Othman in Saudi Arabia’s Alkhobar

DAMMAM: As you walk into the five-star Kempinski Al-Othman Hotel in Alkhobar, you know it will be a memorable affair. A sweet smell of hydrangeas and soothing music welcome you as you step into the foyer. As you head up to the second floor, toward the Sky Lounge and Sky Bridge, you are greeted with stunning views of the Alkhobar skyline.
Once you are comfortably seated in the plush French Bergère-style arm chairs, you can fully admire the passion for European luxury that the Kempinski brand embodies. With its high ceilings and chandeliers, the Sky Lounge is reminiscent of the many upscale cafés of Europe. What is particular to this one is that amidst the art and chandeliers are larger-than-life date trees that add a lit bit of Saudi Arabia to the European aesthetic.
The words “high tea” conjure up images of aristocrats dressed in their finery, discussing their affairs over a cup of tea and dainty food — all following very specific etiquette, much like the qahwa culture of Saudi Arabia. In modern times, high tea has become so synonymous with British culture that it is obligatory to visit the likes of Claridge’s in London to experience this British affair in its entirety.
The high tea at the Kempinski Al-Othman comes very close in my opinion. The server is discreet in bringing out the spread and even explains everything that is on the three-tiered platter. Starting at the top, there were dense chocolate and raisin scones served with whipped cream, strawberry jam and apricot jam. Then, we worked our way down to the last tier, which was reserved for canapés, including avocado and chicken, egg and mayonnaise, tomato with mozzarella and pesto bruschetta options.
To satisfy your sweet tooth, there is a five-tier platter of pastries, ranging from classic French macarons in raspberry and mango flavors to the traditional esh Al-bulbul kunafa (the bird’s nest kunafa). The first tier includes bite-sized brownies and apple crumble cakes. Between sips of tea, be sure to sample the fresh fruit chocolate and caramel meringue tarts. The options available for the most important part of the afternoon, the tea itself, included English, sky, lemon and red berry tea. The teatime spread also includes fresh carrot juice shots and a scrumptious blackberry-yogurt concoction.
While being prim and proper, do remember that not all tea sessions need to be pretentious and, more importantly, are about having a good time. It is all about enjoying the tea and delicacies interspersed with hearty, enjoyable conversation. Needless to say, be sure to take two hours or more of your time to indulge in the lavish treats, enlightening conversation and the beautiful sunset over the city.
The spread costs SR180 for two people and is open from 1:00pm to 7:00pm every day. If you wish to book your table, reservations can be made in advance.


Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations

In this March 22, 2012 file photo, a doctor demonstrates how an infant can die due to unsafe sleeping practices using a scene re-enactment doll in Norfolk, Va. (AP)
Updated 22 April 2019
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Blankets, bed-sharing common in accidental baby suffocations

  • The authors studied 2011-2014 data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention registry of deaths in 10 states
  • Young babies can’t easily move away from bedding or a sleeping parent; all of the study deaths were in infants younger than 8 months old

CHICAGO: Accidental suffocation is a leading cause of injury deaths in US infants and common scenarios involve blankets, bed-sharing with parents and other unsafe sleep practices, an analysis of government data found.
These deaths “are entirely preventable. That’s the most important point,” said Dr. Fern Hauck, a co-author and University of Virginia expert in infant deaths.
Among 250 suffocation deaths, roughly 70 percent involved blankets, pillows or other soft bedding that blocked infants’ airways. Half of these soft bedding-related deaths occurred in an adult bed where most babies were sleeping on their stomachs.
Almost 20 percent suffocated when someone in the bed accidentally moved against or on top of them, and about 12 percent died when their faces were wedged against a wall or mattress.
The authors studied 2011-2014 data from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention registry of deaths in 10 states. The results offer a more detailed look at death circumstances than previous studies using vital records, said lead author Alexa Erck Lambert, a CDC researcher.
The authors said anecdotal reports suggest there’s been little change in unsafe sleep practices in more recent years.
“It is very, very distressing that in the US we’re just seeing this resistance, or persistence of these high numbers,” Hauck said.
The study was published Monday in Pediatrics.
For years, the US government and the American Academy of Pediatrics have waged safe-sleep campaigns aimed at preventing accidental infant suffocations and strangulations and sudden infant death syndrome. These include “back to sleep” advice promoting having babies sleep on their backs, which experts believe contributed to a decline in SIDS deaths over nearly 30 years. But bed-sharing has increased, along with bed-related accidental suffocations — from 6 deaths per 100,000 infants in 1999 to 23 per 100,000 in 2015, the researchers note.
Dr. Rachel Moon, a University of Virginia pediatrics professor not involved in the study, said the results are not surprising.
“Every day I talk to parents who have lost babies. They thought they were doing the right thing, and it seems safe and it seems OK, until you lose a baby,” Moon said.
Some studies have found bed-sharing increases breastfeeding and it’s common in some families because of cultural traditions. Others simply can’t afford a crib.
Erika Moulton, a stay-at-home mom in suburban New York, said bed-sharing was the only way her son, Hugo, would sleep as a newborn. Moulton struggled with getting enough sleep herself for months, and while she knew doctors advise against it, bed-sharing seemed like the only option.
Now 14 months old, “he’s still in our bed,” she said. “Trying to transition him out is a little difficult.”
The pediatricians group recommends that infants sleep on firm mattresses in their own cribs or bassinets but in their parents’ room for the first year. A tight-fitting top sheet is the only crib bedding recommended, to avoid suffocation or strangulation.
Young babies can’t easily move away from bedding or a sleeping parent; all of the study deaths were in infants younger than 8 months old.