Decoding Dyler: Saudi YouTube sensation raps his way to success

Updated 05 November 2017
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Decoding Dyler: Saudi YouTube sensation raps his way to success

RIYADH: A well-known YouTuber in Saudi Arabia described the magical recipe that allowed the videos of the young rapper Abdul Aziz Rabih Al-Dulaijan, known as “Dyler” to reach 220 million views on his YouTube channel in a period of 11 months, a “smart” investment by the followers who are children and love the repetition of the same verses.
Dyler’s close YouTuber friend, who refused to disclose his name for personal reasons, said that 16-year-old Dyler, who created his YouTube channel less than a year ago in Riyadh, has achieved his great success according to a pre-studied plan, describing the YouTube revolution happening today as a virus that suddenly spreads and is hard to deal with.
His friend told Arab News that Dyler and other YouTubers are getting millions of views because their videos include repetition, which amazes children.
Dyler’s song “Madrasa” (school) alone had 10 million views in the first 10 days. His friend said that despite the poor quality of the picture and content, the song is a big success, due to its harmonization which appeals to kids between four and 17 years old.
He described Dyler’s choice of songs about school and allowance a “smart” one as it interests a wide section of teenagers and kids.
A modern media professor at Umm Al-Qura University, Ousama Madani, told Arab News that YouTube is one of the world’s most widespread and most common social media platforms as it allows people to react to videos, share their ideas and showcase their talents. During the past five years, YouTubers have become more popular in the Arab world, he added. “One of the reasons behind Dyler and other YouTubers’ successes is the great support provided by advertising agencies directly without an intermediary company like Google AdSense,” he added.
Saudi YouTubers have achieved greater success than other Arabs on the platform because the Saudi experience is a unique one that provides a greater diversity of content (entertainment, social, political), said Madani.
He added that a phenomenon like Dyler performing rap usually creates controversy on social media until a new phenomenon appears and spreads among youths.


Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

Updated 21 October 2018
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Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

JOHANNESBURG: Two of six critically endangered black rhinos have died of unknown causes five months after being flown from South Africa to Chad in a pioneering project to re-introduce the animals, officials said Sunday.
Rhinos in Chad were wiped out by poaching nearly 50 years ago, and the six rhinos were intended to establish a new population in the country after intensive anti-poaching measures were put in place to protect them.
“We can confirm that these two rhinos (a male and a female) were not poached,” the South African environment department and Chad government said in a joint statement. “However, the exact cause of death is not yet known.”
In July, there was widespread outrage and a bitter row over responsibility when 11 black rhinos in Kenya died after being transferred to a new sanctuary, mainly due to toxic levels of salt in borehole drinking water.
The rhinos in Chad had been roaming free in Zakouma National Park since late August after a gradual acclimatization process that saw them first released into small enclosures.
The carcasses of the cow and bull were discovered on October 15.
The surviving four rhinos are being closely monitored, the statement said, adding that a specialist veterinarian had traveled to the park to conduct postmortems.
It said the cause of death would be announced as soon as possible.
In May, the six rhinos were sedated with darts, put in special ventilated steel crates and driven under police escort from Addo park in South Africa to Port Elizabeth airport.
They were then flown to Chad on a 3,000-mile (4,800-kilometer) flight, accompanied by a team of vets checking their stress levels.
The high-profile transfer, which took two years of planning, was hailed as major conservation breakthrough, with translocation organizer African Parks describing it as a “truly hopeful story.”
There are fewer than 25,000 rhinos left in the wild in Africa due to a surge in poaching, and only 5,000 of them are black rhinos.
Black rhinos are rated as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
Rhinos are targeted to feed a booming demand for rhino horn in China, Vietnam and other Asian countries, where it is believed to have medicinal qualities.
Northern white rhinos disappeared from Chad several decades ago and the last western black rhino was recorded there in 1972, after decades of poaching pushed both subspecies to local extinction.
Rhinos were re-introduced to Rwanda in 2017.