Snapchat outage prompts complaints on Twitter

(Reuters/Thomas White)
Updated 07 November 2017
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Snapchat outage prompts complaints on Twitter

Snapchat faced a worldwide outage for at least four hours on Monday, prompting a flood of complaints on rival mobile application Twitter a day before posting its third quarterly earnings as a public company.
“We’re aware of the issue and working on a fix,” Snapchat said on its support Twitter account, recommending that users stay logged on. (http://bit.ly/2AgZCnj)
Many users tweeted about being unable to sign on after logging off the app, which is popular among people under 30 for posting pictures that are automatically deleted within 24 hours.
Twitter user @bradleykeegan11 wrote, “(Snapchat)Won’t let me log in and keeps saying ‘could not connect’.”
A spokesman for the Snap Inc. unit did not immediately respond to a query about the size and cause of the outage.
Snapchat had at least a couple of technical issues in October, according to its Twitter support page.
Snap, which went public in May, is scheduled to report third quarter earnings on Tuesday. Its stock closed down 2.8 percent at $14.83 on Monday, below its initial public offering price of $17.


WhatsApp seeks to stem fake news ahead of Pakistan election

Updated 18 July 2018
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WhatsApp seeks to stem fake news ahead of Pakistan election

  • Pakistan’s leading English-language daily listed ten tips on differentiating rumors from fact
  • WhatsApp had come under pressure from Indian authorities to put an end to the spread of rumors

ISLAMABAD: The hugely popular WhatsApp messaging service began a week-long publicity campaign in Pakistan Wednesday offering tips to spot fake news, days before the country holds a general election.
“Together we can fight false information,” says the full-page ad in Dawn, Pakistan’s leading English-language daily, listing ten tips on differentiating rumors from fact.
“Many messages containing hoaxes or fake news have spelling mistakes. Look for these signs so you can check if the information is accurate,” it says.
“If you read something that makes you angry or afraid, ask whether it was shared to make you feel that way. And if the answer is yes, think twice before sharing it again.”
WhatsApp also announced the implementation in the country of a new feature allowing recipients to see if a message is original or forwarded.
The company had bought full-page advertising in India on July 10 after a wave of lynchings in the country were linked to viral “fake news” spread by WhatsApp about alleged child kidnappings.
WhatsApp, owned by Facebook, had come under pressure from Indian authorities to put an end to the spread of rumors, which have caused the deaths of more than 20 people in the past two months.
Millions of people use WhatsApp in neighboring Pakistan, where rumors, false information and conspiracy theories are ubiquitous. Such messages spread quickly, with no real way for recipients to check their veracity.
Pakistan also has a history of mob violence, and videos such as the murder of Mashal Khan — a journalism student accused of blasphemy who was killed by a mob in April 2017 — circulate rapidly.
Parliamentary elections are scheduled for July 25.