Indian teenager kills schoolmate to postpone exams

A man is seen with handcuffs in this April 11, 2007 file photo. (File photo by Reuters)
Updated 08 November 2017
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Indian teenager kills schoolmate to postpone exams

NEW DELHI: India arrested a teenager Wednesday for allegedly slitting the throat of a seven-year-old schoolmate in hopes the murder would lead to an exam being postponed, federal investigators said.
The 16-year-old is accused of killing his young schoolmate in September at a smart private school near Delhi in an attempt to delay an impending test and parent-teacher meeting.
Police had initially detained a bus conductor over the murder, claiming he killed the boy after the young pupil resisted a sex attack.
But a spokesman for federal investigators said they had credible evidence against the “academically weak teenager, whose motive was to postpone the examination and a forthcoming parent-teacher meeting.”
“He admitted during questioning that he wanted to shut the school to defer the exams and meeting,” Central Bureau of Investigation spokesman R.K. Gaur told AFP.
The teenager, who cannot be named for legal reasons, would be sent to a juvenile detention center until his trial for murder, he added.
Gaur said the bus conductor would remain in custody until cleared by a court of any wrongdoing.
The crime made national headlines and stoked concern among parents over safety in schools.
India’s swelling middle class has fueled the growth of private schools in a country where public education is under immense strain.
Much prestige is placed on academic achievement and children face intense pressure to score good grades. Experts say this has aggravated stress and mental illness among teenagers.
India, a nation of 1.25 billion, has the world’s highest rate of suicide. Students are particularly vulnerable.
Official figures show nearly 9,000 students committed suicide in 2015.
Health experts say many young people find it difficult to cope with the pressure to succeed and struggle to accept failure in examinations.


Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

Dr. Bumbum. (Courtesy: Facebook)
Updated 18 July 2018
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Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

  • She was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died
  • Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out

RIO DE JANEIRO: A Brazilian celebrity butt-enhancement surgeon called Dr. Bumbum has gone on the run following the death of a patient just hours after undergoing cosmetic surgery at his home in Rio de Janeiro.
Denis Furtado was considered capable of performing magic on women’s bodies, in particular their bottoms, and became known throughout the country for his expertise.
The 45-year-old’s Instagram account reflects his popularity with 650,000 followers.
But now he is wanted by police after Lilian Quezia Calixto died just hours after a butt enlargement procedure at his home in the swanky Barra de Tijuca neighborhood.
Calixto had traveled 2,000 kilometers (1,250 miles) from her home in Cuiaba to see the surgeon to the stars.
But following the controversial injection of acrylic glass filler, Calixto started feeling ill.
Upon arriving at hospital on Sunday, she was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died.
Soon after, Furtado disappeared and is now wanted for homicide and criminal association, while his girlfriend, who some media claim was also his assistant, has been detained.
The news has caused shock waves throughout the industry — Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out.
The Brazilian Plastic Surgery Society (SBPC) was quick to denounce Furtado, saying “the growing invasion of non-specialists in the specialty has provoked more and more fatalities like this one.”
“You cannot perform plastic surgery inside an apartment. Many people are selling a dream, a fantasy to patients in an unethical way and people, weakened, are often attracted to low prices, without considering whether or not the conditions are adequate,” SBPC president Niveo Steffen told AFP.
Steffen said the injection of synthetic biopolymers or polymers, like acrylic glass, is very dangerous and has caused dozens of deaths among women in Latin America, especially in Venezuela.
He said Furtado’s case demonstrates the “trivialization of cosmetic procedures by unspecialized professionals, who often aren’t doctors and are putting people at risk.”
According to the G1 Internet site, Furtado has been charged by police four times for illegally practicing medicine and crimes against consumers.