Nawal Al-Kuwaitia to replace Ahlam on ‘The Voice’

Nawal Al-Kuwaitia
Updated 08 November 2017
0

Nawal Al-Kuwaitia to replace Ahlam on ‘The Voice’

JEDDAH: Emirati singer Ahlam has been replaced by Nawal Al-Kuwaitia on the regional version of popular talent show “The Voice.”
It was Al-Kuwaitia herself who announced the news, as she posted a tweet on her official account saying that she will be joining Elissa, Assi Al-Hallani and Mohammed Hamaki in the 4th season of “The Voice.”
She added: “I would like to thank MBC channel for inviting me to participate on The Voice as a member of the jury.”
The decision to let Ahlam go, according to her tweets, was caused by a tweet she posted on her official account: “I wish fine and true art would come back,” when a new song called “Tell Qatar” was released, in which a number of prominent singers from the UAE had participated.
The song aims to deliver a message to Qatar warning it against its hostile policy against Arab countries and calling on it to stop supporting terrorism, which has destabilized the region.
Ahlam tried to fix the situation and posted two tweets indicating that the tweet she had made was one hour before the release of “Tell Qatar” on YouTube.
In a second tweet, Ahlam said: “All the loyalty and love to my country. No hater can question it. My loyalty was and always will be Emirati and I’m proud of this, end of story.”
Still, many people welcomed Nawal Al-Kuwaiti to “The Voice” and highlighted her great musical history and knowledge, claiming that she truly deserves a place on the jury.
It was revealed that both the first and second parts (Blind Auditions and Battle Rounds) of “The Voice” have already been filmed. The first episode will air on Dec. 2 on MBC.
However, MBC has neither confirmed nor denied the change up.


Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

Updated 15 min 52 sec ago
0

Two rhinos die in Chad after being relocated from S.Africa

JOHANNESBURG: Two of six critically endangered black rhinos have died of unknown causes five months after being flown from South Africa to Chad in a pioneering project to re-introduce the animals, officials said Sunday.
Rhinos in Chad were wiped out by poaching nearly 50 years ago, and the six rhinos were intended to establish a new population in the country after intensive anti-poaching measures were put in place to protect them.
“We can confirm that these two rhinos (a male and a female) were not poached,” the South African environment department and Chad government said in a joint statement. “However, the exact cause of death is not yet known.”
In July, there was widespread outrage and a bitter row over responsibility when 11 black rhinos in Kenya died after being transferred to a new sanctuary, mainly due to toxic levels of salt in borehole drinking water.
The rhinos in Chad had been roaming free in Zakouma National Park since late August after a gradual acclimatization process that saw them first released into small enclosures.
The carcasses of the cow and bull were discovered on October 15.
The surviving four rhinos are being closely monitored, the statement said, adding that a specialist veterinarian had traveled to the park to conduct postmortems.
It said the cause of death would be announced as soon as possible.
In May, the six rhinos were sedated with darts, put in special ventilated steel crates and driven under police escort from Addo park in South Africa to Port Elizabeth airport.
They were then flown to Chad on a 3,000-mile (4,800-kilometer) flight, accompanied by a team of vets checking their stress levels.
The high-profile transfer, which took two years of planning, was hailed as major conservation breakthrough, with translocation organizer African Parks describing it as a “truly hopeful story.”
There are fewer than 25,000 rhinos left in the wild in Africa due to a surge in poaching, and only 5,000 of them are black rhinos.
Black rhinos are rated as critically endangered by the International Union for Conservation of Nature.
Rhinos are targeted to feed a booming demand for rhino horn in China, Vietnam and other Asian countries, where it is believed to have medicinal qualities.
Northern white rhinos disappeared from Chad several decades ago and the last western black rhino was recorded there in 1972, after decades of poaching pushed both subspecies to local extinction.
Rhinos were re-introduced to Rwanda in 2017.