Facebook trials new system to stop intimate photos being posted by angry exes

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Updated 09 November 2017
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Facebook trials new system to stop intimate photos being posted by angry exes

SYDNEY: Facebook is trying to combat “revenge porn” by encouraging users in Australia to submit their nude photos to a pilot project designed to prevent intimate images from being shared without consent.
Adults who have shared nude or sexually explicit photos with someone online, and who are worried about unauthorized distribution, can report images to the Australian government’s eSafety Commission.
They then securely send the photos to themselves via Messenger, a process that allows Facebook to “hash” them, creating a unique digital fingerprint.
This identifier is then used to block any further distribution on Facebook, Instagram and Messenger as a pre-emptive strike against revenge porn, a common method of abuse and exploitation online.
“We’re using image-matching technology to prevent non-consensual intimate images from being shared,” said Antigone Davis, Facebook’s head of global safety.
A Facebook spokesman said Britain, Canada and the United States are also expected to take part in the project.
“It removes control and power from the perpetrator who is ostensibly trying to amplify the humiliation of the victim among friends, family and colleagues,” eSafety commissioner Julie Inman Grant told AFP.
Inman Grant said that if successful, the Facebook trial should be extended to other online platforms.
“The precedent already exists for the sharing of child exploitation images and countering violent extremism online, and by extending to image-based abuse we are taking the burden off the victims to report to multiple online platforms,” she said.
Australia is among world leaders in efforts to combat revenge porn.
Its eSafety Commission launched an online portal last month, allowing victims to report cases where their photos have been shared on the Internet without consent. The commission then works with websites and search engines to have them removed.
A recent survey by the commission showed one in five women in Australia aged 18-45 suffered image-based abuse, with Facebook and its Messenger app accounting for 53 percent of revenge porn, followed by Snapchat at 11 percent then Instagram at four percent.
Research by Melbourne’s Monash University earlier this year found people were falling prey to abusive behavior on a “mass scale,” and that men and women were equally likely to be targeted.


Vietnam withdraws license of news site, issues fine

Updated 17 July 2018
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Vietnam withdraws license of news site, issues fine

  • The one-party state controls most media and has jailed activists and bloggers critical of the government, but revoking licenses is rare
  • The website was one of the most widely read in the country, publishing critical content on politics, lifestyle and social issues

HANOI: A popular Vietnamese news website has been suspended and fined about $10,000 after it was accused of publishing false information, as the communist government quashes any perceived criticism.
The one-party state controls most media and has jailed activists and bloggers critical of the government, but revoking licenses is rare.
The Ministry of Information and Communication said in an announcement Monday that the state-owned Tuoi Tre Online misquoted President Tran Dai Quang in an article in June that had him endorsing the idea of a law on demonstrations.
In a separate report last year on highway development, comments posted on the site had also contributed to undermining “national unity,” the announcement said.
The report on the president came days after scores were detained in June, following sometimes violent protests in several cities against planned special economic zones seen as opening the door to land takeovers by China.
An American-Vietnamese citizen arrested during the crackdown is expected to face trial this week.
The demonstrations were not mentioned in the order from the ministry, which said the outlet must pay a fine, surrender its license for three months, publish a correction and issue an apology.
“Tuoi Tre Online must seriously obey this decision,” the ministry said.
The newspaper connected with the site published a note Tuesday in print saying it would comply with the order.
“Tuoi Tre Online will have to say good bye to our readers for three months, starting July 16,” it said.
“During this time, Tuoi Tre Online will proceed with the perfection of its personnel, improving its content so that we can serve readers better when we are back.”
It said several print publications published by the same institution would continue operating normally.
The website was one of the most widely read in the country, publishing critical content on politics, lifestyle and social issues.