Amal Clooney to co-chair Met Gala

Amal Clooney
Updated 09 November 2017
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Amal Clooney to co-chair Met Gala

NEW YORK: It is the most sought after invitation in the celebrity universe — and on Wednesday, Amal Clooney, Rihanna and Donatella Versace were named co-chairs of next year’s glittering Met Gala in New York.
Held every year on the first Monday in May, the black-tie extravaganza is the chief source of income for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s Costume Institute, reportedly raising more than $13 million in 2016.
Tickets are said to cost $30,000 each or $275,000 for a table, ruling out all but the most elite coterie of A-list Hollywood actors, best-selling music superstars, top models and fashion designers.
Clooney — the 39-year-old British-Lebanese wife of Hollywood heartthrob George and new mother of twins — is feted as much for her fashion sense as her work as an international human rights lawyer.
Rihanna, 29, needs no introduction as one of the biggest pop stars on the planet, also lauded for her bold style, and Versace is the 62-year-old legendary Italian designer and sister of Gianni, who was murdered in Miami in 1997.
Vogue editor-in-chief Anna Wintour — who has singlehandedly transformed the ball into the hottest ticket in town — is also co-chair of the event, which will be held on May 7.
But there is one person definitely not invited. Wintour told “Late Late Show” host James Corden last month that she would never invite back Donald Trump — who has attended with wife Melania in the past, before he was elected US president.
Wintour was a prominent Hillary Clinton fundraiser.
The theme is “Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination,” which the Museum also announced is the title of next year’s exhibition at The Costume Institute.
The exhibition, which will open May 10, will feature papal robes and accessories flown from the Vatican that will serve as the “cornerstone” and showcase the influence of liturgical vestments on designers, the museum said.
Designers in the exhibition will include Balenciaga, Chanel, Givenchy, Karl Lagerfeld, the Versaces and Vivienne Westwood.


Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

Dr. Bumbum. (Courtesy: Facebook)
Updated 18 July 2018
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Celebrity cosmetic surgeon in Brazil vanishes after patient dies

  • She was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died
  • Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out

RIO DE JANEIRO: A Brazilian celebrity butt-enhancement surgeon called Dr. Bumbum has gone on the run following the death of a patient just hours after undergoing cosmetic surgery at his home in Rio de Janeiro.
Denis Furtado was considered capable of performing magic on women’s bodies, in particular their bottoms, and became known throughout the country for his expertise.
The 45-year-old’s Instagram account reflects his popularity with 650,000 followers.
But now he is wanted by police after Lilian Quezia Calixto died just hours after a butt enlargement procedure at his home in the swanky Barra de Tijuca neighborhood.
Calixto had traveled 2,000 kilometers (1,250 miles) from her home in Cuiaba to see the surgeon to the stars.
But following the controversial injection of acrylic glass filler, Calixto started feeling ill.
Upon arriving at hospital on Sunday, she was suffering from a racing heart-beat and hypertension, and after four heart attacks she died.
Soon after, Furtado disappeared and is now wanted for homicide and criminal association, while his girlfriend, who some media claim was also his assistant, has been detained.
The news has caused shock waves throughout the industry — Brazil is second only to the United States for the number of plastic surgeries carried out.
The Brazilian Plastic Surgery Society (SBPC) was quick to denounce Furtado, saying “the growing invasion of non-specialists in the specialty has provoked more and more fatalities like this one.”
“You cannot perform plastic surgery inside an apartment. Many people are selling a dream, a fantasy to patients in an unethical way and people, weakened, are often attracted to low prices, without considering whether or not the conditions are adequate,” SBPC president Niveo Steffen told AFP.
Steffen said the injection of synthetic biopolymers or polymers, like acrylic glass, is very dangerous and has caused dozens of deaths among women in Latin America, especially in Venezuela.
He said Furtado’s case demonstrates the “trivialization of cosmetic procedures by unspecialized professionals, who often aren’t doctors and are putting people at risk.”
According to the G1 Internet site, Furtado has been charged by police four times for illegally practicing medicine and crimes against consumers.